Archives for posts with tag: shipping markets

Over the ten years since the onset of the financial crisis, it has generally been tough going for the shipping markets, but not without upside at times (see SIW 1339). Today, the bulkcarrier and containership sectors look to have made some helpful progress recently while tankers are lagging behind, but looking at earnings in the major sectors across the last ten years as a whole might just tell a broader story…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

The summer of 2018 has been a scorcher! Now that suits some people pretty well of course, but if you happen to be, say, a phlegmatic British shipping analyst sizzling away in the City of London, this sort of heat can leave you pining for the cold and wet to which you are accustomed. So in a spirit of escapism, this week’s Analysis uses Clarksons SeaNet data to take a look at activity in the lovely, chilly north…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Since 1.73m bpd of oil output cuts were orchestrated by OPEC in November 2016, oil prices have risen from under $50/bbl to $70-$80/bbl, stimulating the upstream sector but making for a gloomy backdrop to challenged tanker markets in the last 18 months. With this context in mind and following the latest OPEC meeting, it is worth looking in detail at some of the ways OPEC policy has been influencing oil markets…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

2018 looks set to be a good year for ABBA fans, after the Swedish pop group announced plans to release their first new songs since the 1980s. With the band’s greatest hits album back in the charts again, it’s clear there’s still appetite for recycling old classics. In shipping’s recycling market, meanwhile, 2018 has seen volumes remain elevated, but with different ship types having stepped into the spotlight.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

When shipping markets start to move into the next phase of the cycle following a downturn, sometimes the percentage increases in earnings can look very impressive indeed. But of course they’re generally from a low base. With some of the shipping sectors now moving into a new phase, how else might the improvements be put into a helpful context?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Historically, the fuel of choice for the vast majority of large cargo ships has been heavy fuel oil. But in 2020, sulphur oxide emissions will be capped to 0.5% by IMO convention, ruling out current standard grades of HFO. Both fuel consumers in the shipping industry and producers in the refining industry have now had a little time to consider the potential options to deal with the imminent regulatory change…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

“Look after the pennies and the pounds look after themselves” goes the saying, a mantra the shipping industry has a long taken to heart. In this week’s Analysis, we review trends in ship operating expenses (OPEX) that have taken the total cost base of the shipping industry through the $100 billion barrier for the very first time.

Watching The Pennies!

Of all global industries, perhaps few have had the extreme cost focus of shipping over the past 30 years. During the 1980s recession, any operating “fat” was largely removed with the growth of open registries and a drive to outsourcing. This helped shipping, alongside its near “perfect” competitive economic model, deliver exceptionally cheap and secure freight, in turn a key facilitator of globalisation.

Nice And Lean…

OPEX response since the financial crisis has been relatively modest. Our average OPEX index (using the ClarkSea “fleet” mix and information from Moore Stephens) shows just a 1% decrease in OPEX since the financial crisis to $6,451/day in 2016. By comparison, the ClarkSea Index dropped 71%, from $32,660/day in 2008 to $9,441/day in 2016 (a record low). In part, this modest, albeit painfully achieved, drop reflects upward pressures from an expanding fleet and items such as crew and ever- increasing regulation. However it also reflects the already lean nature of OPEX.

$100 Billion And Counting…

Our estimate for aggregate global OPEX for the world’s cargo fleet has now breached $100 billion for the first time, up from $98 billion last year and $83 billion in 2008. The largest constituent remains crew wages ($43 billion covering 1.4 million crew across the fleet). By comparison aggregate ship earnings for our cargo fleet fell from an eye watering $291 billion in 2008 to $123 billion in 2016!

Cutting The Fat…

One sector that has seen dramatic cost reduction has been offshore. Estimates vary, but 30% seems a reasonable rule of thumb for reductions in OPEX since 2014. While painful, this has been part of a process of making offshore more competitive against other energy sources (offshore contributes 28% of oil production, 31% of gas, and 16% of all energy) and one of the factors behind the increase in sanctioning of offshore projects.

Getting Smarter…

So shipping is one of the leanest industries around but is always under pressure to do more! It seems clear that squeezing cost in the traditional sense, offshore aside, will be pretty challenging — UK media reported on the docking of the 20,150 teu MOL Triumph, highlighting it was manned by only 20 crew! Getting smarter, collecting and using “big data” and technology and automation are all gaining traction. The industry’s fuel bill (accounted for outside of OPEX) is clearly a big target.

This will all require new technology, skills and perhaps new accounting approaches. Plenty of food for thought but it seems like just going on another severe diet won’t work this time. Have a nice day!

SIW1272