Archives for posts with tag: shipping market

Economists use a range of tools to demonstrate the degree of fragmentation, consolidation, or in economic terms, ‘concentration’ across a range of industrial activity. Shipping is often thought of as a fairly fragmented industry, and the shipbuilding industry is today undergoing a period of significant consolidation. How might an economics approach illustrate the prevailing degree of concentration in each case?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

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2018 so far has been a year of firming oil prices. Despite continued strong output growth from US shale, the crude price has risen, with Brent even topping $80/bbl, fuelled by political risk: Venezuelan instability, North Korea and sanctions on Iran. Supply outages, plus higher prices muting demand, have hit the tanker market. However, the flip side has been more positive indications (at last) in the offshore sector.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

In June 2016, the ‘Neo-Panamax’ locks at the Panama Canal opened to commercial traffic, enabling a much larger proportion of the world’s fleet to transit the canal. Nearly two years on, official dimension restrictions at the Neo-Panamax locks are being amended, with an even greater share of the fleet theoretically capable of passing through the canal from 1st June onwards.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

As the shipping community begins to gather for Posidonia, this week’s analysis reviews the market leading position of Greek owners. Ten years on from the financial crisis, Greek owners have expanded their control of the world fleet from a 13% to 17% share, today operating some 218m GT (370m dwt) valued at USD 105 billion. Certainly worth raising a glass (or two) while enjoying the parties and cocktails!

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Across the spectrum of seaborne trade, crude oil and containers could hardly be more different. The former is the classic raw material commodity, whilst the latter represents the shipping of all sorts of manufactured end products. Yet in 2017, total seaborne trade in each stood less than 170 million tonnes apart, with a combined volume of 3.8 billion tonnes accounting for 33% of overall global seaborne trade.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The shipping industry is essential to the smooth functioning of the world economy, transporting around 85% of the world’s international trade in tonnage terms. So it comes as no surprise that ships are all over the world at any given time. However, the ability to identify ships’ positions by vessel tracking systems today means that one can be more precise than ever in breaking this down a little further…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

One year ago we reported that it looked like container shipping was “at last starting to build towards something more positive” and that “2016 may well be seen as the year in which the container shipping sector really started to tackle its problems head on.” One year later, it looks like 2017 lived up to at least some of the expectations, with improved market conditions clearly visible.

 

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.