Archives for posts with tag: Shipping Intelligence Weekly

Once in a while, one of the many statistics regularly updated in Shipping Intelligence Weekly reaches a major milestone, and this month we have a significant one to reflect upon. As of May 2019, for the very first time we have been able to report on a global shipping fleet comprising over 2 billion deadweight tonnes in capacity. This week’s Analysis reviews the progress from the first billion dwt to the second…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

It is well known that China ‘turbo-charged’ seaborne trade growth from the early 2000s onwards, as the country’s imports of raw materials such as iron ore, coal and crude oil grew at breakneck speed. Following a 2018 in which Chinese LNG imports represented 60% (15 million tonnes) of net global growth in seaborne LNG trade, it seems only natural to ask, could recent history repeat itself with LNG?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Providing newbuilding market data has always been a strong focus for Clarksons Research but in recent years there has been a growing need to better understand activity in the ship repair and refurbishment sector. In this week’s Analysis we discuss the reasons behind this interest and present some highlights from a new intelligence flow of ship repair activity now available on our World Fleet Register.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

Environmental concerns are increasingly to the fore in world political economy, with the global energy mix and questions of “peak demand” for different fossil fuels receiving increasing attention as a result. While there is clearly still much uncertainty around this topic, it is worth exploring how shipping continues to develop alongside the changing dynamics of the global energy mix.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Conditions in the offshore sector have been challenging for several years now, and many on the outside might presume that market signals would still be very negative. But key offshore metrics appear more varied, with some parts of the market having seen greater improvements than expected whilst others remained stubbornly weak. Why do the indicators seem a little mixed, and what do they really tell us?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

It is often noted that the shipping market’s component parts make it ‘multi-cyclical’, helpful in an industry where the number of variables is large and volatility prevalent. It seems like this view is a reasonable assumption: at any given time one or more markets may be under pressure but equally circumstances are likely to be favouring other markets at the same time. But how to test it?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Sale and purchase has long been a central part of the shipping markets, and with 13,800 units reported sold secondhand across the shipping and offshore sectors over the last decade, this clearly remains the case. In fact, 2017 was a record year for S&P volumes with 2018 not too far behind. A range of factors influence secondhand transaction volumes; comparing ‘liquidity’ across sectors highlights some of these.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.