Archives for posts with tag: Shipping Intelligence Network

At the start of April, the commencement of joint operations between the major Japanese liner companies in the form of ‘ONE’ ushered in the latest step along the road in the consolidation of the container shipping sector. In February 2017 we took a look at how the concentration in the sector was evolving, and now seems like a good time to review how the profile looks today.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

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The economist John Maynard Keynes famously commented that “In the long run we are all dead”, and for shipping market players waiting for cyclical markets to improve it might sometimes feel like that. But with two of the previously long-suffering sectors enjoying better times recently, how do the improved market conditions impact on a long-term view of performance?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

Fluid dynamics is the study of non-solid matter: that which is mutable, volatile and mercurial! The analogies with the complex world of gas and seaborne LNG trade are obvious. But just as fluid dynamics is a framework for analysing the maelstrom of physical reality, so too can the gas trade be viewed through various helpful frameworks, for example that of the changing global energy mix.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

Sometimes in shipping, as in life, things come along that nobody really expects. US shale/tight oil production, which was barely on the radar ten years ago, seems to be one of those things. The most recent news, of US crude being unloaded in the Middle East and of output passing 1970s levels, has not come entirely out of the blue. But imagine saying ten years ago that the USA could soon be a net oil exporter…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

One of the great stories of the Bible’s New Testament centres on the feeding of a multitude of 5,000 with just five loaves and two small fish. Shipping also has a notable 5,000 to feed in the form of the containership fleet. In this case, the feat has not only been continually finding enough cargo for the fleet to carry but also generating more capacity across a similar number of ships as time has gone by.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

Since the 2H 2014 offshore downturn, when investment in new exploration and development dried up, many offshore vessel owners will have tended to agree with the child heroine of the 1976 musical Annie: “It’s a hard knock life”. However after three years of setbacks and weak markets, some are now starting to see positives, as a few indicators show encouraging signs. But does that mean it’s time to invest?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The Economist’s ‘Big Mac’ Index is a well-known comparison of the relative cost of an item (in this case the ubiquitous burger) in different countries, once the local currency has been converted into US dollars, to provide an indication of the cost of living in various places around the world. In shipping, largely, the dollar rules, but investors still need ways of measuring the cost of potential returns…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.