Archives for posts with tag: Shipping Intelligence Network

Although the shipping industry is only at the start of a unprecedented investment program around fleet renewal ($1 trillion of newbuild orders this decade?) and shoreside infrastructure to deal with emissions reduction, this week’s Analysis features extracts from our latest Fuelling Transition series profiling important progress so far in uptake of Alternative Fuels, ESTs, “Eco” engines, scrubbers and port facilities.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

This year so far has seen major disruption to seaborne trade volumes from the Covid-19 pandemic (see SIW 1,443), but significant trends have also been apparent on the supply side. Despite underlying fleet growth, trends in floating storage, scrubber retrofitting, and ‘idle’ boxship capacity have led to sometimes dramatic developments in ‘active’ fleet capacity in the major sectors over recent months.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Against the backdrop of a container shipping sector improving ahead of the expectations of many, this week the 1-year TC rate for an “old Panamax” containership reached a 9-year high of $18,750/day, more than 4 years after the opening of the new, wider Panama Canal locks that some believed would usher in a steady demise for the vessels in this sector.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

In this week’s Analysis we preview extracts from our latest Fuelling Transition report. Besides our usual update on regulation, technology uptake including alternative fuels, economic impacts and future scenarios, we also present additional analysis on CO2 emissions across the industry (shipping is 2.3% of global emissions), within the main shipping fleets and of individual shipping companies.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Back in April (see SIW 1,418), aggregate port call data helped our “near-term” assessment of the size of the initial “shock” and disruption to shipping market activity from the Covid-19 pandemic. Across the following six months, the data has formed part of our tracking of the ongoing impact (see our ‘Port Call Activity Tracker’ on SIN), and continues to provide context and framework.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The Covid-19 pandemic has had a dramatic impact on the shipping markets this year. Extracted from our forthcoming Shipping Review & Outlook, here we outline the major demand ‘shock’ and initial signs of improvement in some indicators over the summer, as well as the continuation of underlying trends, including the ‘manageable’ supply side and the energy and fuelling transition.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

While indicators suggest that the impact of Covid-19 on global seaborne trade may have eased a little in recent months (see SIW 1,433), this year overall has undoubtedly been a very difficult period for seaborne demand. However, whilst imports into many regions have decreased significantly, demand in China, shipping’s largest market, has remained robust, with imports recently reaching record highs.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Tracking ‘idle’ containership capacity has become something of an institution in the box shipping sector, particularly in the years since the global financial crisis. Back in early 2009 it was reported that around 11% of all containership capacity stood ‘inactive’. Tracking idle boxship capacity through recent years reveals a similar peak during the Covid-19 crisis, but also a rapidly changing picture.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The containership sector has long been one of the key areas of vessel “upsizing” in the world fleet, and 2020 so far has seen some new “landmarks”, with larger units than ever before sold for recycling. Vessels recently sold for scrap were once considered to be the “megaships” of their day, which highlights the extent to which things can change as time passes…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

In last year’s annual review, we profiled a strong expansion phase for the LNG market (12% trade growth in 2019). But this is also an industry with a long “stop-start” history and it looks like 2020 (driven by both Covid-19 and some pre-Covid drivers) will see recent growth stall. Despite these challenges, there remains encouraging long term growth potential and increasing opportunities from the bunkering market.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.