Archives for posts with tag: shipping industry

Over the last year or so, it has been clear that risks to the seaborne demand environment have been increasing. While there are still plenty of positive drivers, a number of headwinds have clearly developed, and projections for seaborne trade growth in 2019 have been revised downwards since the start of the year. What factors are having the biggest impact, and where have revisions been most pronounced?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

This year, the shipping industry is expected to transport 12bn tonnes of cargo. That’s double the volume shipped in 2000 and four times the trade in 1980; the result of economic growth and globalisation. Dry bulk and container trade were at the heart of this in the boom of the 2000s, but both over time and across sectors the seaborne trade growth environment continues to evolve.

 

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Heavyweights in the political arena are commonly referred to as the “Big Beasts”, but the world shipping fleet has plenty of massive animals of its own. Prominent amongst these are the very large containerships including today’s ‘mega-ships’ of over 20,000 TEU, and together the ships of over 8,000 TEU in size (the ‘big beast’ benchmark back in 2000) now account for the majority of boxship fleet capacity.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Conditions in the offshore sector have been challenging for several years now, and many on the outside might presume that market signals would still be very negative. But key offshore metrics appear more varied, with some parts of the market having seen greater improvements than expected whilst others remained stubbornly weak. Why do the indicators seem a little mixed, and what do they really tell us?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

It is often noted that the shipping market’s component parts make it ‘multi-cyclical’, helpful in an industry where the number of variables is large and volatility prevalent. It seems like this view is a reasonable assumption: at any given time one or more markets may be under pressure but equally circumstances are likely to be favouring other markets at the same time. But how to test it?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The first quarter of the year is often a seasonally weak period for the shipping markets, and 2019 so far has proved no exception. Although the ClarkSea Index has risen by 13% y-o-y so far this year, it still fell by over 30% from multi-year highs in late 2018 to below $10,000/day by mid-February. Against a backdrop of building demand risks, how severe has this year’s seasonal slide been in a historical context?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Across the global seaborne trade spectrum, crude oil is generally seen as a fairly mature element, and average growth of not much more than 1% p.a. across the period since the financial crisis appears to back that up. But in that period there have also been dynamics at play which have had a major impact on tanker demand patterns, and on closer inspection it has not been the slow lane all the way either…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.