Archives for posts with tag: shipbuilding

Climate change experts have recently estimated that the last four years have been the hottest on record, but in shipping it feels like a different matter altogether. As a whole the markets do appear to have seen some further gradual improvement in 2018, but without heating up too much. But do wider readings of the shipping ‘temperature’ tell us anything more?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The last few years have marked a particularly challenging period for the shipbuilding industry, with contracting activity generally remaining limited and many yards facing difficulties. However, focusing on those builders which have been able to take contracts reveals one interesting angle, with the volume of orders per yard heading upwards, driven by both longer term trends and more recent changes.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Among the many specialised vessels to be found within the diverse world of shipping are Floating Production, Storage and Offloading (FPSO) units, which are used to exploit offshore oil and gas fields. Although few in number compared to say, tankers, they tend to be high-value units, and market cycles in the FPSO sector make for an interesting comparison with more conventional shipping markets.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

Economists use a range of tools to demonstrate the degree of fragmentation, consolidation, or in economic terms, ‘concentration’ across a range of industrial activity. Shipping is often thought of as a fairly fragmented industry, and the shipbuilding industry is today undergoing a period of significant consolidation. How might an economics approach illustrate the prevailing degree of concentration in each case?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

A common ‘rule of thumb’ statistic in shipping market analysis, in order to give an idea of prospective capacity growth, is the orderbook expressed as a percentage of the existing fleet. Today, at a global fleet level, that figure stands at a historically relatively low level in dwt terms (10%), but what does that actually tell us? This week’s Analysis takes a look at the pros and cons of this widely used statistic.

 

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

With the industry hoping for better “grades” after the “effort” of recent years, this week’s Analysis updates our half year shipping report showing a ClarkSea Index up 9% y-o-y but still below trend since the financial crisis (see Graph of the Week). After comments of “must do better” and “showing potential” in recent years, do the statistics suggest “extra classes” will again be needed over the summer holidays?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

As the shipping community begins to gather for Posidonia, this week’s analysis reviews the market leading position of Greek owners. Ten years on from the financial crisis, Greek owners have expanded their control of the world fleet from a 13% to 17% share, today operating some 218m GT (370m dwt) valued at USD 105 billion. Certainly worth raising a glass (or two) while enjoying the parties and cocktails!

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.