Archives for posts with tag: shipbuilding

We all know shipbuilding is one of the toughest businesses around but just how tough was 2018? Well it seems the answer depends on which unit of measurement you use! Using DWT, ordering fell 14% to 77m dwt while using CGT, a better reflection of the work content of building vessels, ordering increased by 2%. On balance its seems that conditions remain challenging but still improving on the 2016 lows.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The ClarkSea Index made steady progress in 2018 (+13% to $12,144/day) taking it above the average since the financial crisis. Tankers had a miserable year before being “saved” by a strong Q4, bulkers consolidated their 2017 gains and LNG finished the year on a high. Fleet growth continues to trend below 3%, with just 11% of the fleet on order, while trade growth eased and needs to be watched closely.

 

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Climate change experts have recently estimated that the last four years have been the hottest on record, but in shipping it feels like a different matter altogether. As a whole the markets do appear to have seen some further gradual improvement in 2018, but without heating up too much. But do wider readings of the shipping ‘temperature’ tell us anything more?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The last few years have marked a particularly challenging period for the shipbuilding industry, with contracting activity generally remaining limited and many yards facing difficulties. However, focusing on those builders which have been able to take contracts reveals one interesting angle, with the volume of orders per yard heading upwards, driven by both longer term trends and more recent changes.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Among the many specialised vessels to be found within the diverse world of shipping are Floating Production, Storage and Offloading (FPSO) units, which are used to exploit offshore oil and gas fields. Although few in number compared to say, tankers, they tend to be high-value units, and market cycles in the FPSO sector make for an interesting comparison with more conventional shipping markets.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

Economists use a range of tools to demonstrate the degree of fragmentation, consolidation, or in economic terms, ‘concentration’ across a range of industrial activity. Shipping is often thought of as a fairly fragmented industry, and the shipbuilding industry is today undergoing a period of significant consolidation. How might an economics approach illustrate the prevailing degree of concentration in each case?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

A common ‘rule of thumb’ statistic in shipping market analysis, in order to give an idea of prospective capacity growth, is the orderbook expressed as a percentage of the existing fleet. Today, at a global fleet level, that figure stands at a historically relatively low level in dwt terms (10%), but what does that actually tell us? This week’s Analysis takes a look at the pros and cons of this widely used statistic.

 

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.