Archives for posts with tag: shallow water fields

To much fanfare and accompanied by voluminous industry coverage, Mexico recently concluded Round 1.4, the country’s first ever deepwater licensing round. However, Mexico’s shallow waters may yet have a future too: Bay of Campeche reserves remain considerable and indeed, the country’s third shallow water bid round is ongoing. It is therefore worth reviewing the current state of shallow water E&P in Mexico.

Veering Off Course

Mexican offshore oil is currently produced entirely from shallow water fields, as has always been the case. The key sources of Mexican offshore oil have been several large field complexes such as Cantarell and Ku-Maloob-Zaap. As these fields and others came online, the country’s offshore oil output grew with a robust CAGR of 6.6% from 1980 to 2004, reaching a peak of 2.83m bpd in 2004. As the graph implies, four complexes accounted for 93% of this production. Decline set in thereafter at ageing fields (production at Cantarell began at the Akal field in 1979). Pemex – the sole operator of Mexican offshore fields prior to 2014 – tried to halt production decline, but with little success, given budget and technical constraints. Thus by 2013, offshore oil production at the four key field complexes had fallen to 1.31m bpd, accounting for 69% of Mexico’s offshore oil production of 1.90m bpd.

Getting Back On Track

This situation prompted President Peña Nieto’s government to initiate energy sector reforms in 2013, opening up the country’s upstream sector to foreign companies for the first time since 1938. Pemex was granted 83% of Mexican 2P reserves in “Round Zero” in 2014. The first shallow water round, Round 1.1, followed in December 2014. Only two of 14 blocks were awarded though, reportedly due to unfavourable fiscal terms inhibiting bidding by oil companies. The authorities then improved terms before launching Round 1.2 (shallow water), Round 1.3 (onshore) and Round 1.4 in 2015. Round 1.2 was better received than 1.1: as per the inset, 60% of blocks were awarded (75% of the km2 area on offer). One of the round’s victors, Eni, has already been granted permission to drill four appraisal wells on Block 1.

Turning Things Around?

In light of these positives, there are high hopes for Round 2.1, a shallow water round launched in July 2016. Indeed, 10 out of the 15 Round 2.1 blocks are in the prolific Sureste Basin, home to the Cantarell complex. Eight of these ten areas are unexplored, so there is sizeable upside potential, and have been mapped with 3D seismic, so operators could begin drilling promptly. Moreover, the surface area of the blocks in Round 2.1 are twice that of Round 1.1. It should also be noted that according to a 2016 IEA study, Mexico’s shallow waters still account for 29% of the country’s remaining technically recoverable oil resources. Finally, with rates for a high spec jack-up in the GoM assessed at about $85-90,000/day in January 2017, down 45% on three years ago, some oil companies might be tempted to make a move on a round that could offer a relatively low cost means to grow oil reserves and production.

So arguably, Mexican shallow water E&P is on the road again. There are potential hazards of course, such as oil price volatility or Mexico’s relationship with the US. But it is not implausible to think that Mexican shallow water oil production might speed up again in the coming years.

OIMT201702

E&P offshore India can be divided into two very distinct species of activity: the one species is typified by shallow water exploration using jack-up drilling rigs, and by multi-phase fixed platform developments; the other species by ultra-deepwater exploration using floaters. The first is concentrated off the west coast, the second off the east coast. But when it comes to CAPEX, which species of activity sits at the top of the food chain in these lean times?

Shallow Water Ancestry

Mumbai High is the ancestor and primordial archetype of the vast majority of field developments offshore India today. Discovered in 1974 in the Mumbai Basin off the country’s west coast, the field was brought onstream in 1976 and was initially exploited via 4 fixed platforms in water depths of around 85m. Subsequent expansions have seen this number rise to 159, with 8 more platforms being fabricated for the Ph.3 redevelopment projects at the field. For the first 30 years of Indian offshore E&P, exploration was focused in the Mumbai Basin while development followed the pattern at Mumbai High. Hence, as of July 2015, 94 fields had been discovered off India’s west coast, all in shallow waters, accounting for 48% of Indian offshore discoveries. Of these 94 fields, 39 are active and 11 are under development. The basin also accounts for 301 active fixed platforms, as well as 13% (18 units) of the jack-up fleet in the Middle East/ISC region. With EOR and redevelopment work underway, the Mumbai Basin remains an important area of offshore activity.

Deepwater Diversification

However, since 2002 the Indian offshore sector has bifurcated to produce a very different species of offshore activity. Exploration campaigns in the east coast Krishna Godavari Basin resulted in 50 new discoveries in water depths >500m (and 51 shallow water finds). Amongst these was KG-DWN-2005/1-A, a field in a water depth of 3,166m, making it the deepest find (in terms of water depth) to date globally. At the height of KG Basin exploration, 12 floaters were active in the country. All this being said, Indian deepwater activity is much less advanced than shallow water E&P: just two deepwater fields are in production and none are currently under development. As a corollary, there are almost no subsea installations offshore India and just one active MOPU.

An Evolutionary Hiatus?

There are, however, 25 ‘probable’ deepwater field developments, including some potentially prolific fields. However, development seems to have been inhibited by the example of KG-D6 (Dhirubhai 1&3), a deepwater (850m) gas field which has shown precipitous production decline. India’s offshore sector is also dominated by indigenous companies like the government-controlled ONGC, who seemingly lack the deepwater technological or operational expertise of many IOCs. At the same time, there are still 88 potential shallow water fields, as well as plenty of scope for EOR at older fields – the sort of projects where Indian oil companies have substantial experience.

Opening up of the upstream sector, as is being attempted in Mexico, might be one means to adapt to the challenges of the “P” of deepwater E&P in India. However, this does not appear to be on the cards for the immediate future. So for the time being, given the hostile conditions of the weaker oil price environment, shallow water activity seems set to thrive best.

OIMT201507

Self-Elevating Platforms (‘SEPs’) are generally used to provide offshore support for construction and maintenance projects. These units fall within the wider ‘construction’ sector in the segmentation of the offshore fleet, and can generally operate in water depths of up to 120m. The key deployment areas for these structures exist in the US Gulf of Mexico (GoM), West Africa and the Middle East. Despite high numbers of shallow water developments in the North Sea and South East Asia, there has been relatively little deployment of SEPs in these regions, although recent contracting patterns within South East Asia suggest this may soon change.

Rising Above Regional Regimen

The Graph of the Month shows the regional breakdown of producing fields with a water depth of <100m, as well as the share of self-elevating platform deployment across these regions. South-East Asia contains the largest number of shallow water developments with 552 active fields, closely followed by the US GoM (508) and the North Sea (452). However, there is a large disparity between these regions in terms of SEP deployment, with the US GoM accounting for the deployment of 161 units compared to the North Sea and South East Asia where just 10 and 19 structures are deployed respectively.

Lower deployment numbers in these regions can be largely attributed to a major factor in each region. In the North Sea, self-elevating platform use is often restricted by harsh operating conditions. In South-East Asia an ample supply of support vessels has provided ships for use in construction and support duties in the region.

Jacking-Up Orders

The current SEP orderbook includes 24 units with a record combined contract value of almost $2bn, of which 13 are for South-East Asian owners. Of the 15 contracts agreed in 2014, 60% of these are for Asian owners. Although these units will be capable of operating internationally, indications from owners including Teras Offshore, Swissco Marine and East Sunrise Group hint at a South-East Asian target market. There is a large fleet of mid-sized supply vessels in the region and historically these units have worked similar roles to the SEP fleet. However, the mid-sized supply vessel orderbook has diminished from around 200 units in 2012 to the current total of around 70 vessels, potentially supporting future deployment of SEPs in the region.

Lifting Expectations

An abundance of shallow water fields and relatively benign conditions means that South-East Asia is a region with strong potential for the future deployment of SEPs. Despite a lack of historical deployment, the attraction of competitive day rates in comparison to support vessels has reportedly begun to attract interest, in turn leading to investment in newbuild units from Asian owners.

So, a reduced orderbook for mid-sized supply units and an expected increase in field developments within China and South-East Asia could be positive news for SEP owners. Whilst still way below levels of deployment in the Gulf of Mexico, this region could provide impetus to self-elevating platform demand in the future.

OIMT201410