Archives for posts with tag: seaborne trade

Environmental concerns are increasingly to the fore in world political economy, with the global energy mix and questions of “peak demand” for different fossil fuels receiving increasing attention as a result. While there is clearly still much uncertainty around this topic, it is worth exploring how shipping continues to develop alongside the changing dynamics of the global energy mix.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Building trade tension between the US and China featured heavily in the headlines in 2018, driving concerns over the possible impact of the ‘trade war’. Both countries imposed new tariffs on a wide range of goods during the year (see SIW 1340 for discussion of the ‘shipping context’), but how has the seaborne trade environment actually been impacted by the dispute?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Across the global seaborne trade spectrum, crude oil is generally seen as a fairly mature element, and average growth of not much more than 1% p.a. across the period since the financial crisis appears to back that up. But in that period there have also been dynamics at play which have had a major impact on tanker demand patterns, and on closer inspection it has not been the slow lane all the way either…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

Seaborne LNG trade is playing an increasingly significant role in the internationalisation of the natural gas marketplace, a process with many facets including the changing global energy mix, LNG infrastructure projects and technology such as shale gas, FLNG, and FSRU. This week’s Analysis focuses on the key trends, which are covered in more detail in the recently published LNG Trade & Transport 2018.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Across the spectrum of seaborne trade, crude oil and containers could hardly be more different. The former is the classic raw material commodity, whilst the latter represents the shipping of all sorts of manufactured end products. Yet in 2017, total seaborne trade in each stood less than 170 million tonnes apart, with a combined volume of 3.8 billion tonnes accounting for 33% of overall global seaborne trade.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Sometimes in shipping, as in life, things come along that nobody really expects. US shale/tight oil production, which was barely on the radar ten years ago, seems to be one of those things. The most recent news, of US crude being unloaded in the Middle East and of output passing 1970s levels, has not come entirely out of the blue. But imagine saying ten years ago that the USA could soon be a net oil exporter…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

The car carrier sector has experienced very challenging market conditions over recent years, partly reflecting an estimated 2% decline in global seaborne car trade between 2013 and 2016. However, in common with a number of other shipping sectors, 2017 so far has seen an encouraging return to notably more positive trends on the demand side.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.