Archives for posts with tag: orderbook

2021 looks set to be a marquee year for shipowners in many sectors, with recent Analysis in SIW 1476 and SIW 1492 exploring the impact of surging containership and bulkcarrier earnings. On the other side of the coin, the recovery in shipping markets has also sparked something of a resurgence in newbuilding activity. After the first three quarters of the year, how are shipbuilders faring so far?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

A shrinking global orderbook has been one of the more persistent features of the post-financial crisis years, with the volume of tonnage on order now down to c.30% of peak levels. However, a substantial volume of newbuild investment has still taken place over the period as a whole, and a greater focus on specific vessel types has left the current orderbook looking very different to a decade earlier.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

Offshore contracting has remained at extremely low levels for a number of years, and the mobile offshore orderbook has now shrunk to less than a quarter of its peak size. Furthermore, the majority of units on order in the MDU and OSV sectors were now contracted more than five years ago. This month’s Analysis examines what’s still on the orderbook and where solutions have been found.

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

 

Climate change experts have recently estimated that the last four years have been the hottest on record, but in shipping it feels like a different matter altogether. As a whole the markets do appear to have seen some further gradual improvement in 2018, but without heating up too much. But do wider readings of the shipping ‘temperature’ tell us anything more?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The mobile offshore orderbook reached its lowest level since 2005 at the start of August. Furthermore, a significant portion has been on order for a number of years, with a large share of these units having already been launched. As uncertainty continues to cloud the future for many of these vessels, this month’s Analysis investigates the nature of the offshore orderbook in more detail.

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

Next month over 50,000 will gather for the biennial SMM fair in Hamburg. Since the last fair (coinciding with the lowest ever ClarkSea Index!) there have been major developments, not least in environmental regulation. Despite an eroding newbuild orderbook, a modest uptick in ordering and recent enthusiasm for scrubbers are set to combine with plenty of positive discussion around technology and digitalisation!

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Although some indicators seem to suggest that the offshore markets have now bottomed out, most segments of the ‘cradle-to-grave’ offshore fleet are still facing significant challenges, often due to persistent vessel oversupply. One more positive sector though has been FPSOs, which is largely project driven and which has been supported by a rise in FIDs. So what is the outlook for FPSO contracting to 2020?

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

One of the great stories of the Bible’s New Testament centres on the feeding of a multitude of 5,000 with just five loaves and two small fish. Shipping also has a notable 5,000 to feed in the form of the containership fleet. In this case, the feat has not only been continually finding enough cargo for the fleet to carry but also generating more capacity across a similar number of ships as time has gone by.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

Despite an uptick in ordering, 2017 was another difficult year for the shipbuilding industry, with contracting remaining well below trend and most shipyards continuing to feel the pressure. Some sectors saw improved contracting activity, while deliveries remained relatively firm, but shipbuilders will be looking to see more positive changes before predicting a return to better times.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The development of the global merchant fleet is affected by a very broad range of interwoven supply and demand factors, including shipping and commodity cycles, investor sentiment, regulatory concerns, yard capacity and so on. Another factor is shore-side infrastructure projects, which can be tricky to disentangle from the wider web, though this influence is a little clearer on, for example, the LNG carrier sector…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.