Archives for posts with tag: market

In these extraordinary times, the cancellation of school exams has been one of many unprecedented events. As we examine performance in our half year report, this is not an option for the shipping industry as it battles through the many challenges (and some upside) that Covid-19 has brought: a severe 5.6% drop in seaborne trade; a 10% drop in port activity; sharp declines in demolition and newbuild ordering.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

In our March semi-annual report, we cited satellite imagery of reduced pollution as economic activity slowed as a “stark reminder of climate change”. In this week’s Analysis, we look at some of the challenges (and opportunities) the shipping industry potentially faces with its cargo base, changes in offshore activity and in reducing its own emissions footprint through fuel transition, technology and regulation.

For the full version of this article, please go to
Shipping Intelligence Network

As Analysis in SIW 1,395 illustrated, vessel speed dynamics have been a notable part of the shipping market story over the last decade or so. With another full year of average vessel speed data to examine, it’s a good time for an update, focussing in on the trends last year in particular but also re-visiting the broader importance of tracking vessel speeds…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Climate change experts have recently estimated that the last four years have been the hottest on record, but in shipping it feels like a different matter altogether. As a whole the markets do appear to have seen some further gradual improvement in 2018, but without heating up too much. But do wider readings of the shipping ‘temperature’ tell us anything more?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The Middle East is a key component of global oil production. In total, it accounts for just under 25m bpd of oil output (or 30m bpd including NGLs), of which nearly a quarter is produced offshore. The Middle East also produces 63.5bn cfd of gas (64% offshore). The majority of Middle Eastern producers are OPEC members, so the group’s decisions have a large impact on production volumes in the region.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

As recent history demonstrates, if the global oil supply-demand balance moves from a deficit of supply to a surplus, or vice versa, the effect on oil prices and hence the offshore sector can be far reaching. At present, as 2019 draws nearer, oil demand and supply look to be increasingly finely balanced. However, there are still a range of uncertainties that could significantly shift the current oil supply-demand outlook.

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

On 15th September 2008, the collapse of Lehman Brothers crystallised the financial crisis and the onset of the worst economic downturn for a century. To a shipping industry used to extreme cycles but transitioning to recession with rapid trade collapse and a huge newbuilding orderbook the initial shock was severe and the “hangover” prolonged. This week’s Analysis compares the situation almost ten years to the day.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

The mobile offshore orderbook reached its lowest level since 2005 at the start of August. Furthermore, a significant portion has been on order for a number of years, with a large share of these units having already been launched. As uncertainty continues to cloud the future for many of these vessels, this month’s Analysis investigates the nature of the offshore orderbook in more detail.

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

Economists use a range of tools to demonstrate the degree of fragmentation, consolidation, or in economic terms, ‘concentration’ across a range of industrial activity. Shipping is often thought of as a fairly fragmented industry, and the shipbuilding industry is today undergoing a period of significant consolidation. How might an economics approach illustrate the prevailing degree of concentration in each case?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The container shipping sector derives many of its characteristics from the dual but separate nature of the freight and charter markets, and 2018 so far has seen some distinctly ‘two-tier’ trends in the box shipping space, with freight and charter rates experiencing a clear difference in performance. What has caused that to happen, and how likely is it to be sustained?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.