Archives for posts with tag: global industry

The car carrier sector has experienced very challenging market conditions over recent years, partly reflecting an estimated 2% decline in global seaborne car trade between 2013 and 2016. However, in common with a number of other shipping sectors, 2017 so far has seen an encouraging return to notably more positive trends on the demand side.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

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Indian offshore fields used to be the main source of the natural gas consumed in India’s rapidly growing, energy-hungry economy; now however, it is LNG imports. This recent change is largely due to a decline in the country’s offshore gas output. But as part of a drive to reduce reliance on energy imports, the Indian government has been introducing policies designed to raise offshore gas production once more…

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

Just prior to Halloween, the UN announced that levels of CO2 in the atmosphere reached new record levels of 403 ppm in 2016. The shipping industry remains a broadly efficient transportation solution in terms of emissions per tonne of cargo, but the news will only increase the focus on what new action may now be necessary, against the spectre of substantial fleet growth over the last decade.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

When shipping markets start to move into the next phase of the cycle following a downturn, sometimes the percentage increases in earnings can look very impressive indeed. But of course they’re generally from a low base. With some of the shipping sectors now moving into a new phase, how else might the improvements be put into a helpful context?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

British cycling star Chris Froome has taken on one long cycle after another, currently tackling the Tour Of Spain following his fourth Tour De France victory back in July. Two long cycles are ongoing in the shipbuilding sector too, and this week’s Analysis takes a look at the progress of the delivery cycles in the merchant vessel and mobile offshore sectors, through a challenging period for the industry.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The North Sea and even more so the frontiers west of the Shetlands and in the Barents Sea are known for their often challenging operating conditions of rough seas, stormy skies and limited visibility. Unfortunately, the native climate could be seen as something of a metaphor for the region’s offshore markets at present, though a keen observer might spy mercurial signs of fairer weather on the distant horizon…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

In the metal and mineral bulk trades, as in the heavy metal music scene, a few very big names often end up dominating the headlines: metal has the likes of Metallica, Rammstein and Judas Priest; mining bulk has iron ore and coal. But in both cases, the triumphs and travails of the smaller names can often be just as riveting and indicative of the broader trends as those of the superstars…

Atlas, Rise!

The ‘mining bulks’ consist of the metallic and mineral outputs of the extractive industries (and substitutes such as scrap metal destined for blast furnaces) typically shipped in bulkcarriers. Seaborne trade in mining bulks is projected to stand at 3,415mt in 2017. Unsurprisingly, the ‘mining’ major bulks of iron ore and coal predominate in the forecast. Even so, ‘mining’ minor bulks (a range of commodities utilised primarily in metallurgy such as bauxite, manganese ore, nickel ore, copper concentrate and coke) still make up a respectable 22% of the projection. As part of the cargo creating demand for a bulker fleet of over 11,000 vessels, the mining minor bulks are no minor matter.

As for demand for the mining minor bulks, while there are numerous importers, China has been the main driver of seaborne trade growth. Since the start of the century, seaborne trade in mining minor bulks has increased at a CAGR of 3.4% whereas imports into China have grown at a CAGR of 16%. The disparities are just as apparent in specific areas such as bauxite/alumina (4.5% versus 21%) and other non-ferrous ores (8.5% versus 20%, with metals like manganese used in steel alloys). Indeed, China accounts for more than 50% of growth in seaborne mining minor bulk imports since 2000. Just as in shipping and seaborne trade generally, China has played a key role in mining minor bulk trade growth.

Reise, Reise

The picture is more complex on the supply side, with mining minor bulks sourced from a range of countries, none accounting for more than 9% of total exports. Developing countries are prominent. For example, the Philippines is projected to account for 75% of nickel ore exports in 2017, Guinea for 45% of bauxite exports and Chile for 38% of copper concentrate exports. Some developed economies like Australia are involved, but on the whole, trends in mining minor bulk further confirm the ongoing diversification of shipping trade networks, particularly between China and other developing economies.

Metal Meltdown

As the Graph of the Month shows, mining minor bulk trade can also be very volatile, another common feature of seaborne trade. Mining minor bulk volatility is in part due to political risk factors such as strikes and government policy. Indonesia accounted for 57% (65mt) of seaborne nickel ore exports in 2013; by 2015, it was exporting no nickel ore at all following the mineral ore export ban introduced to boost the domestic smelting sector.

So the mining minor bulks are in sense akin to more obscure heavy metal bands. They may be complex and often idiosyncratic but certain key themes are apparent: the impact of China, the emergence of new trade patterns and market volatility, each illustrating broader trends in shipping too. Have a nice day.

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