Archives for posts with tag: global economic

In these extraordinary times, the cancellation of school exams has been one of many unprecedented events. As we examine performance in our half year report, this is not an option for the shipping industry as it battles through the many challenges (and some upside) that Covid-19 has brought: a severe 5.6% drop in seaborne trade; a 10% drop in port activity; sharp declines in demolition and newbuild ordering.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

In our March semi-annual report, we cited satellite imagery of reduced pollution as economic activity slowed as a “stark reminder of climate change”. In this week’s Analysis, we look at some of the challenges (and opportunities) the shipping industry potentially faces with its cargo base, changes in offshore activity and in reducing its own emissions footprint through fuel transition, technology and regulation.

For the full version of this article, please go to
Shipping Intelligence Network

It is well known that China ‘turbo-charged’ seaborne trade growth from the early 2000s onwards, as the country’s imports of raw materials such as iron ore, coal and crude oil grew at breakneck speed. Following a 2018 in which Chinese LNG imports represented 60% (15 million tonnes) of net global growth in seaborne LNG trade, it seems only natural to ask, could recent history repeat itself with LNG?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Conditions in the offshore sector have been challenging for several years now, and many on the outside might presume that market signals would still be very negative. But key offshore metrics appear more varied, with some parts of the market having seen greater improvements than expected whilst others remained stubbornly weak. Why do the indicators seem a little mixed, and what do they really tell us?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Oil prices have always been big news for shipping and offshore, and are currently making the headlines. Since early October, crude prices have undergone one of the lengthiest periods of steady decline on record. Whilst the steep drops from the heights of $147/bbl in 2008 and $114/bbl in 2014 were clearly more substantial as a whole, the recent downward trend is certainly noteworthy. So what’s going on?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The Middle East Gulf, which laps the shores of several major OPEC countries, holds 32% of the world’s 60 largest offshore oil fields, some of which have been active for 60 years. But though it is a mature area, in 2018 it is still projected to account for 28% and 34% of global offshore oil and gas production, with output having been supported by a large number of expansion, EOR and redevelopment projects.

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

The Middle East is a key component of global oil production. In total, it accounts for just under 25m bpd of oil output (or 30m bpd including NGLs), of which nearly a quarter is produced offshore. The Middle East also produces 63.5bn cfd of gas (64% offshore). The majority of Middle Eastern producers are OPEC members, so the group’s decisions have a large impact on production volumes in the region.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

As recent history demonstrates, if the global oil supply-demand balance moves from a deficit of supply to a surplus, or vice versa, the effect on oil prices and hence the offshore sector can be far reaching. At present, as 2019 draws nearer, oil demand and supply look to be increasingly finely balanced. However, there are still a range of uncertainties that could significantly shift the current oil supply-demand outlook.

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

On 15th September 2008, the collapse of Lehman Brothers crystallised the financial crisis and the onset of the worst economic downturn for a century. To a shipping industry used to extreme cycles but transitioning to recession with rapid trade collapse and a huge newbuilding orderbook the initial shock was severe and the “hangover” prolonged. This week’s Analysis compares the situation almost ten years to the day.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

Next month over 50,000 will gather for the biennial SMM fair in Hamburg. Since the last fair (coinciding with the lowest ever ClarkSea Index!) there have been major developments, not least in environmental regulation. Despite an eroding newbuild orderbook, a modest uptick in ordering and recent enthusiasm for scrubbers are set to combine with plenty of positive discussion around technology and digitalisation!

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.