Archives for posts with tag: Gas

One year ago, we profiled the emergence of a ‘pause’ in growth in the LNG sector, with Covid-19 having dampened energy demand, seaborne LNG trade, gas prices and project sanctioning. However, buoyed initially by a cold winter, LNG trade bounced back firmly in late 2020, and 2021 so far has seen a return to more positive trends across the sector, with long-term growth potential still encouraging.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

A year on from peak trade disruption, we update our half year report for the shipping industry profiling a strong recovery and some exceptional individual markets. While previous years’ reports have mentioned “must do better” or “extra classes needed”, even the toughest of examiners would congratulate (tankers aside!?) shipping’s economic performance during the many continued challenges of the pandemic.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Earlier this year (see SIW 1,467) we reported on our cross-segment ClarkSea Index laying down a new marker, with the average in Q1 the strongest for over a decade. Since then, with positive sentiment enduring in many shipping sectors, progress has continued and we now have another milestone to report: in May-21, the ClarkSea Index averaged its highest level since Sep-08, before the financial crisis.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

A year on from the peak impact of Covid-19 on world seaborne trade, overall volumes have made a strong recovery, returning to positive year-on-year growth territory earlier this year. Following the major variations within 2020, comparing volumes so far this year to the pre-Covid period provides a useful indication of which sectors of trade have seen the firmest recovery and which still have ground to make up.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Much of the analysis of the impacts of Covid-19 has focussed on major short-term shipping market variations and also the benefits from “disruption upside”. 2021 so far has seen more positive sentiment developing across many shipping sectors, and our ClarkSea Index has laid down a new marker, registering the best Q1 average since back in 2008, before the global financial crisis.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Extracted from our upcoming Shipping Review & Outlook, this week’s Analysis profiles recovering trade volumes, an encouraging supply side, the increasingly central role of Green Transition and elements of improved sentiment. While uncertainties around the nature of recovery and pressures from the pandemic remain, our projections suggest trade will return to pre-Covid levels in 2021 and reach 12bn tonnes.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Through 2020 our Analysis regularly looked at latest “near-term” shipping demand indicators, first to assess the magnitude of the initial Covid-19 impact and disruption, and then to track improvements in activity and seaborne trade, as volumes recovered in a number of sectors with some of the negative impacts easing back. This week we take a fresh look at the latest readings to check up on recent progress.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

After a uniquely challenging year for the shipping industry, our first Analysis of the year reviews some of the dramatic trends from a Covid-19 dominated 2020. Benefiting from elements of “disruption upside”, our cross-segment ClarkSea Index actually ended the year down only 2% y-o-y, experiencing its second highest year since 2010 (after 2019) despite global seaborne trade falling 3.8% to 11.5bn tonnes.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

2020 has seen major disruption to the shipping markets and a “shock” to seaborne trade. Volumes in many sectors are now returning, but on a full year basis global seaborne trade is still set to have fallen (latest estimate: -3.6% in tonnes) . However, one underlying trade trend of recent years has sustained, with the “average haul” of seaborne trade looking set to have increased for the fifth consecutive year.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Every year, readers of Shipping Intelligence Weekly are invited to submit their predictions of the value of the ClarkSea Index at the start of November the following year. Of course none of our entrants could have predicted the major challenges and disruption seen across the shipping industry this year, but it can still be useful to review where sentiment was a year ago and how the markets have evolved since.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.