Archives for posts with tag: Fleet Development

On 15th September 2008, the collapse of Lehman Brothers crystallised the financial crisis and the onset of the worst economic downturn for a century. To a shipping industry used to extreme cycles but transitioning to recession with rapid trade collapse and a huge newbuilding orderbook the initial shock was severe and the “hangover” prolonged. This week’s Analysis compares the situation almost ten years to the day.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

The mobile offshore orderbook reached its lowest level since 2005 at the start of August. Furthermore, a significant portion has been on order for a number of years, with a large share of these units having already been launched. As uncertainty continues to cloud the future for many of these vessels, this month’s Analysis investigates the nature of the offshore orderbook in more detail.

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

Economists use a range of tools to demonstrate the degree of fragmentation, consolidation, or in economic terms, ‘concentration’ across a range of industrial activity. Shipping is often thought of as a fairly fragmented industry, and the shipbuilding industry is today undergoing a period of significant consolidation. How might an economics approach illustrate the prevailing degree of concentration in each case?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The container shipping sector derives many of its characteristics from the dual but separate nature of the freight and charter markets, and 2018 so far has seen some distinctly ‘two-tier’ trends in the box shipping space, with freight and charter rates experiencing a clear difference in performance. What has caused that to happen, and how likely is it to be sustained?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

In June 2016, the ‘Neo-Panamax’ locks at the Panama Canal opened to commercial traffic, enabling a much larger proportion of the world’s fleet to transit the canal. Nearly two years on, official dimension restrictions at the Neo-Panamax locks are being amended, with an even greater share of the fleet theoretically capable of passing through the canal from 1st June onwards.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

One of the great stories of the Bible’s New Testament centres on the feeding of a multitude of 5,000 with just five loaves and two small fish. Shipping also has a notable 5,000 to feed in the form of the containership fleet. In this case, the feat has not only been continually finding enough cargo for the fleet to carry but also generating more capacity across a similar number of ships as time has gone by.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

Just prior to Halloween, the UN announced that levels of CO2 in the atmosphere reached new record levels of 403 ppm in 2016. The shipping industry remains a broadly efficient transportation solution in terms of emissions per tonne of cargo, but the news will only increase the focus on what new action may now be necessary, against the spectre of substantial fleet growth over the last decade.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.