Archives for posts with tag: demolition

The ClarkSea Index made steady progress in 2018 (+13% to $12,144/day) taking it above the average since the financial crisis. Tankers had a miserable year before being “saved” by a strong Q4, bulkers consolidated their 2017 gains and LNG finished the year on a high. Fleet growth continues to trend below 3%, with just 11% of the fleet on order, while trade growth eased and needs to be watched closely.

 

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

A common ‘rule of thumb’ statistic in shipping market analysis, in order to give an idea of prospective capacity growth, is the orderbook expressed as a percentage of the existing fleet. Today, at a global fleet level, that figure stands at a historically relatively low level in dwt terms (10%), but what does that actually tell us? This week’s Analysis takes a look at the pros and cons of this widely used statistic.

 

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Shipping market watchers tend to keep a keen eye on prices for younger vessels, with indicators such as the ratio of newbuild to 5 year old prices often key to views on asset play. But decisions towards the end of a ship’s life are important too, and looking at the ratio between secondhand and scrap prices for vessels of an older vintage may help to illuminate the choices facing shipowners.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

With the industry hoping for better “grades” after the “effort” of recent years, this week’s Analysis updates our half year shipping report showing a ClarkSea Index up 9% y-o-y but still below trend since the financial crisis (see Graph of the Week). After comments of “must do better” and “showing potential” in recent years, do the statistics suggest “extra classes” will again be needed over the summer holidays?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

2018 looks set to be a good year for ABBA fans, after the Swedish pop group announced plans to release their first new songs since the 1980s. With the band’s greatest hits album back in the charts again, it’s clear there’s still appetite for recycling old classics. In shipping’s recycling market, meanwhile, 2018 has seen volumes remain elevated, but with different ship types having stepped into the spotlight.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

After reporting on a range of gloomy statistics in 2016, has shipping been able to pick itself up from ‘rock bottom’? Strong trade volumes, a record S&P market and improving bulker and containership markets have all provided some welcome relief. But challenges in the tanker, gas and offshore markets continue while uncertainty around environmental regulation builds. As ever, it’s been an interesting year!

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

In 2016 the shipping industry saw significant supply side adjustments in reaction to continued market pressures. For shipbuilders this meant a historically low level of newbuild demand with fewer than 500 orders reported in 2016, and the volume of tonnage on order declined sharply. Meanwhile, higher levels of delivery slippage and strong demolition saw fleet growth fall to its lowest level in over a decade.SIW1256

Pressure Building Up

2016 was an extremely challenging year for the shipbuilding industry. Contracting activity fell to its lowest level in over 20 years with just 480 orders reported, down 71% year-on-year. Domestic ordering proved important for many builder nations and 68% of orders in dwt terms reported at the top three shipbuilding nations were placed by domestic owners last year. Despite a 6% decline in newbuild price levels over 2016, few owners were tempted to order new ships, especially with the secondhand market offering ‘attractive’ opportunities. Only 48 bulkers and 46 offshore units were reported contracted globally last year, both record lows, and tanker and boxship ordering was limited. As a result, just 126 yards were reported to have won an order (1,000+ GT) in 2016, over 100 yards fewer than in 2015.

A Spot Of Relief

However, a record level of cruise ship and ferry ordering provided some positivity in 2016. Combined, these ship sectors accounted for 52% of last year’s $33.5bn estimated contract investment. European shipyards were clear beneficiaries, taking 3.4m CGT of orders in 2016, the second largest volume of orders behind Chinese shipbuilders’ 4.0m CGT. Year-on-year, contracting at European yards increased 31% in 2016 in terms of CGT while yards in China, Korea and Japan saw contract volumes fall by up to 90% year-on-year.

Further Down The Chain

In light of such weak ordering activity, the global orderbook declined by 29% over the course of 2016, reaching a 12 year low of 223.3m dwt at the start of January 2017. This is equivalent to 12% of the current world fleet. The number of yards reported to have a vessel of 1,000 GT or above on order has fallen from 931 yards back at the start of 2009 to a current total of 372 shipbuilders.

Final Link In The Chain

Adjustments to the supply side in response to challenging market conditions in 2016 have also been reflected in a slower pace of fleet growth. The world fleet currently totals 1,861.9m dwt, over 50% larger than at the start of 2009, but its growth rate slowed to 3.1% year-on-year in 2016. This compares to a CAGR of 5.9% between 2007 and 2016 and is the lowest pace of fleet expansion in over a decade. A significant uptick in the ‘non-delivery’ of the scheduled start year orderbook in 2016, rising to 41% in dwt terms, saw shipyard deliveries remain steady year-on-year at a reported 100.0m dwt. Further, strong demolition activity helped curb fleet growth in 2016 with 44.2m dwt reported sold for recycling, an increase of 14% year-on-year.

End Of The Chain?

So it seems that the ‘market mechanism’ has finally been kicking into action. A more modest pace of supply growth might be welcome news to the shipping industry but further down the chain shipbuilders are suffering. Contracting levels plummeted in 2016 and the orderbook is now significantly smaller. Even with the ongoing reductions in yard capacity, shipbuilders worldwide remain under severe pressure and will certainly be hoping for a more helpful reaction in 2017.