Archives for posts with tag: containership

Last week we reported on some of the recent dramatic swings in asset pricing (see SIW 1,468), noting that these shifts were taking place against the backdrop of an extremely active S&P market. Indeed, after recovering quickly and robustly from the lows of Q2-20, the volume of secondhand sales has jumped to new records in recent months, with the March total an all-time high.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Attention has frequently focussed on “disruption upside” in the shipping markets following the impacts of the Covid-19 crisis. Since late 2020, the container sector has provided a clear example. With box trade volumes recovering swiftly and underlying supply growth moderate, congestion at ports (and currently at Suez too) absorbing capacity has provided additional impetus, driving spectacular market progress. 

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Through 2020 our Analysis regularly looked at latest “near-term” shipping demand indicators, first to assess the magnitude of the initial Covid-19 impact and disruption, and then to track improvements in activity and seaborne trade, as volumes recovered in a number of sectors with some of the negative impacts easing back. This week we take a fresh look at the latest readings to check up on recent progress.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

After a uniquely challenging year for the shipping industry, our first Analysis of the year reviews some of the dramatic trends from a Covid-19 dominated 2020. Benefiting from elements of “disruption upside”, our cross-segment ClarkSea Index actually ended the year down only 2% y-o-y, experiencing its second highest year since 2010 (after 2019) despite global seaborne trade falling 3.8% to 11.5bn tonnes.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

At this point in the year, with many seasonal gifts having previously started the journey to their destination via containership, we often take a look at how the box shipping sector has been faring. As we approach the end of 2020, we can report not only on a rollercoaster ride through a tumultuous year, but also on a firm rebound, and an almost “perfect storm” leading to some record market conditions…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

With shipping at the start of a unprecedented investment program around fleet renewal and shoreside infrastructure to deal with emissions reduction, SIW 1,450 profiled important progress so far in the uptake of Alternative Fuels, ESTs, “Eco” engines, scrubbers and port facilities. This week we drill down on progress in container shipping, a sector already often subject to a greater degree of consumer scrutiny. 

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

30 years is a long time in any sphere, and an even longer time in a fast-paced industry like shipping. The markets of the 1980s seem dim and distant, with a heroic boom and a few crises in between. However, one thing today looks similar: the “classic” orderbook as a percentage of the fleet ratio, a yardstick for assessing future supply growth, is now, at 7.4%, as low as it has been since 1989.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Discussion around average ship sizes usually focusses on “upsizing” in the fleet and vessel deliveries, following the entry of new classes of even larger ships into the world fleet and also new, larger designs in well-established sectors. However, tracking the average size of vessels being recycled reveals some interesting trends too, related to regulation, market and underlying fleet dynamics

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The containership sector has long been one of the key areas of vessel “upsizing” in the world fleet, and 2020 so far has seen some new “landmarks”, with larger units than ever before sold for recycling. Vessels recently sold for scrap were once considered to be the “megaships” of their day, which highlights the extent to which things can change as time passes…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

Heavyweights in the political arena are commonly referred to as the “Big Beasts”, but the world shipping fleet has plenty of massive animals of its own. Prominent amongst these are the very large containerships including today’s ‘mega-ships’ of over 20,000 TEU, and together the ships of over 8,000 TEU in size (the ‘big beast’ benchmark back in 2000) now account for the majority of boxship fleet capacity.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.