Archives for posts with tag: Containers

30 years is a long time in any sphere, and an even longer time in a fast-paced industry like shipping. The markets of the 1980s seem dim and distant, with a heroic boom and a few crises in between. However, one thing today looks similar: the “classic” orderbook as a percentage of the fleet ratio, a yardstick for assessing future supply growth, is now, at 7.4%, as low as it has been since 1989.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

While indicators suggest that the impact of Covid-19 on global seaborne trade may have eased a little in recent months (see SIW 1,433), this year overall has undoubtedly been a very difficult period for seaborne demand. However, whilst imports into many regions have decreased significantly, demand in China, shipping’s largest market, has remained robust, with imports recently reaching record highs.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Tracking ‘idle’ containership capacity has become something of an institution in the box shipping sector, particularly in the years since the global financial crisis. Back in early 2009 it was reported that around 11% of all containership capacity stood ‘inactive’. Tracking idle boxship capacity through recent years reveals a similar peak during the Covid-19 crisis, but also a rapidly changing picture.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The containership sector has long been one of the key areas of vessel “upsizing” in the world fleet, and 2020 so far has seen some new “landmarks”, with larger units than ever before sold for recycling. Vessels recently sold for scrap were once considered to be the “megaships” of their day, which highlights the extent to which things can change as time passes…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

In these extraordinary times, the cancellation of school exams has been one of many unprecedented events. As we examine performance in our half year report, this is not an option for the shipping industry as it battles through the many challenges (and some upside) that Covid-19 has brought: a severe 5.6% drop in seaborne trade; a 10% drop in port activity; sharp declines in demolition and newbuild ordering.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Relations between the US and China have been back in the headlines recently, with tensions seemingly on the rise once more. For the shipping industry, the US-China ‘trade war’ was one of the key issues of 2018-19, and the ‘phase one’ trade deal in early 2020 was an encouraging sign that US-China trade could pick up. But with Covid-19 dominating trends in the year to date, how have volumes fared so far?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

The ‘shock’ to the world economy from the Covid-19 pandemic is exerting clear pressure on seaborne trade. Significant uncertainty remains over the outlook, but current projections suggest the sharpest fall in global seaborne trade for over 35 years in 2020. However, impacts vary across the shipping sectors, with some commodities appearing more heavily exposed to disruption than others.

For the full version of this article, please go to
Shipping Intelligence Network

 

As observed in our Shipping Market Impact Assessment (see SIN), some sectors of economic and seaborne activity are more heavily exposed to the impacts of Covid-19 than others. Previous Analysis has, for example, focussed on global oil demand (SIW 1417), and here we consider the effects on global container trade, the magnitude in a historical context, and the potential nature of the impact as it develops.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

In last week’s Analysis we noted that the impact of the Covid-19 outbreak could lead to months of major disruption and a “bumpy ride” for the shipping markets. This week we take a look back through our long history of seaborne trade data and review the differences between the impacts of previous major disruptions on the periods that followed…

 

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

So often shipping market observers’ attention centres on new ships but shipping’s ongoing fuel transition has also focussed discussion on the older, often less fuel-efficient tonnage in today’s world fleet. In order to understand how the phase out of older ships might look, and estimate its potential impact in certain areas, it”s worth taking a look at the age profile of the world’s tonnage in more detail.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.