Archives for posts with tag: Clarksons

Relations between the US and China have been back in the headlines recently, with tensions seemingly on the rise once more. For the shipping industry, the US-China ‘trade war’ was one of the key issues of 2018-19, and the ‘phase one’ trade deal in early 2020 was an encouraging sign that US-China trade could pick up. But with Covid-19 dominating trends in the year to date, how have volumes fared so far?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

That recent times have been a good demonstration of shipping market volatility comes as no surprise. There have been more than enough major events to drive significant fluctuations in our ClarkSea Index, and the statistics make this clear. Developments in the tanker sector have recently dominated the index trend in terms of volatility, but that doesn’t mean that every sector has followed quite the same storyline… 

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

In our March semi-annual report, we cited satellite imagery of reduced pollution as economic activity slowed as a “stark reminder of climate change”. In this week’s Analysis, we look at some of the challenges (and opportunities) the shipping industry potentially faces with its cargo base, changes in offshore activity and in reducing its own emissions footprint through fuel transition, technology and regulation.

For the full version of this article, please go to
Shipping Intelligence Network

As observed in our Shipping Market Impact Assessment (see SIN), some sectors of economic and seaborne activity are more heavily exposed to the impacts of Covid-19 than others. Previous Analysis has, for example, focussed on global oil demand (SIW 1417), and here we consider the effects on global container trade, the magnitude in a historical context, and the potential nature of the impact as it develops.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The impact of the spread of Covid-19 in Q1 2020 on the energy markets has contributed to a significant shift in the outlook for the offshore industry, as well as the wider oil and gas sector. Operators have shifted rapidly from planning modest increases in CAPEX budgets to making swingeing cuts, and major offshore projects are being delayed and cancelled as a result.

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

 

Hard to believe it’s only six months since we reported the sanctions driven “super-spike”, and harder still to think it’s only six weeks since the collapse of OPEC+ talks took rates back to “heroic” levels! As tanker owners now try to weigh up the huge imbalances building in the energy markets and exactly how much oil the world needs to store afloat, this week’s Analysis reviews an extraordinary tanker market run.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

So often shipping market observers’ attention centres on new ships but shipping’s ongoing fuel transition has also focussed discussion on the older, often less fuel-efficient tonnage in today’s world fleet. In order to understand how the phase out of older ships might look, and estimate its potential impact in certain areas, it”s worth taking a look at the age profile of the world’s tonnage in more detail.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

A shrinking global orderbook has been one of the more persistent features of the post-financial crisis years, with the volume of tonnage on order now down to c.30% of peak levels. However, a substantial volume of newbuild investment has still taken place over the period as a whole, and a greater focus on specific vessel types has left the current orderbook looking very different to a decade earlier.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

Offshore contracting has remained at extremely low levels for a number of years, and the mobile offshore orderbook has now shrunk to less than a quarter of its peak size. Furthermore, the majority of units on order in the MDU and OSV sectors were now contracted more than five years ago. This month’s Analysis examines what’s still on the orderbook and where solutions have been found.

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

 

The ports of the world connect up the global trading system but are far from a homogeneous group. They can be classified in a range of ways including by the functions and facilities they offer and the cargo types they can handle. But equally they can be categorised by size, and in this context port calls data helps to understand the structure of the world’s port network.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.