Archives for posts with tag: Clarksons

The last few years have marked a particularly challenging period for the shipbuilding industry, with contracting activity generally remaining limited and many yards facing difficulties. However, focusing on those builders which have been able to take contracts reveals one interesting angle, with the volume of orders per yard heading upwards, driven by both longer term trends and more recent changes.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Economists use a range of tools to demonstrate the degree of fragmentation, consolidation, or in economic terms, ‘concentration’ across a range of industrial activity. Shipping is often thought of as a fairly fragmented industry, and the shipbuilding industry is today undergoing a period of significant consolidation. How might an economics approach illustrate the prevailing degree of concentration in each case?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Seaborne LNG trade is playing an increasingly significant role in the internationalisation of the natural gas marketplace, a process with many facets including the changing global energy mix, LNG infrastructure projects and technology such as shale gas, FLNG, and FSRU. This week’s Analysis focuses on the key trends, which are covered in more detail in the recently published LNG Trade & Transport 2018.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

With the industry hoping for better “grades” after the “effort” of recent years, this week’s Analysis updates our half year shipping report showing a ClarkSea Index up 9% y-o-y but still below trend since the financial crisis (see Graph of the Week). After comments of “must do better” and “showing potential” in recent years, do the statistics suggest “extra classes” will again be needed over the summer holidays?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

In June 2016, the ‘Neo-Panamax’ locks at the Panama Canal opened to commercial traffic, enabling a much larger proportion of the world’s fleet to transit the canal. Nearly two years on, official dimension restrictions at the Neo-Panamax locks are being amended, with an even greater share of the fleet theoretically capable of passing through the canal from 1st June onwards.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

In the old song “It’s a long way to Tipperary”, the Irish county in question is “a long way back home”. For shipping it must feel a little like that too. Despite more positive sentiment, a supportive world economy, robust trade growth and slowing capacity expansion in many sectors, truly strong markets might still seem in many cases some distance away. But how far along the way are the shipping markets really?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Shipping markets are by their nature cyclical, but anticipating the timing of market cycles is rarely easy in practice, not least because shipping’s cycles are so enmeshed with other economic cycles, notably in underlying commodity markets. For example, while some of the key shipping sectors appear to be moving into the next phase of the cycle, current oil market uncertainties are complicating matters elsewhere.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.