Archives for posts with tag: Clarksons Research

In these extraordinary times, the cancellation of school exams has been one of many unprecedented events. As we examine performance in our half year report, this is not an option for the shipping industry as it battles through the many challenges (and some upside) that Covid-19 has brought: a severe 5.6% drop in seaborne trade; a 10% drop in port activity; sharp declines in demolition and newbuild ordering.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Relations between the US and China have been back in the headlines recently, with tensions seemingly on the rise once more. For the shipping industry, the US-China ‘trade war’ was one of the key issues of 2018-19, and the ‘phase one’ trade deal in early 2020 was an encouraging sign that US-China trade could pick up. But with Covid-19 dominating trends in the year to date, how have volumes fared so far?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

In our March semi-annual report, we cited satellite imagery of reduced pollution as economic activity slowed as a “stark reminder of climate change”. In this week’s Analysis, we look at some of the challenges (and opportunities) the shipping industry potentially faces with its cargo base, changes in offshore activity and in reducing its own emissions footprint through fuel transition, technology and regulation.

For the full version of this article, please go to
Shipping Intelligence Network

With Covid-19 generating major disruption to the world economy and shipping industry, in recent weeks our Analysis has often focussed on demand side “shocks”. However, a range of supply-side impacts are also taking place, with key metrics changing rapidly. Activity is down across shipyard output, newbuild ordering and vessel demolition, with the risk profile evolving as the impact of the pandemic has spread.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The impact of the spread of Covid-19 in Q1 2020 on the energy markets has contributed to a significant shift in the outlook for the offshore industry, as well as the wider oil and gas sector. Operators have shifted rapidly from planning modest increases in CAPEX budgets to making swingeing cuts, and major offshore projects are being delayed and cancelled as a result.

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

 

Last week’s Analysis took a long-term view of seaborne trade. This week, we look at the history of global oil demand, a key driver of seaborne trade (crude and products trade totalled 62m bpd last year, 25% of the total in tonnes), offshore oil production (25m bpd), and oil prices. In 2020, the now global spread of Covid-19 is leading to major disruption to oil demand, and the ‘long’ view provides an interesting context.
Shipping Intelligence Network.

Even for an industry used to disruption events, the impact of Covid-19 has been dramatic. Extracted from our upcoming Shipping Review & Outlook (SRO), our Analysis this week covers some of the underlying trends we have discussed previously (ClarkSea, global trade, energy transition, “manageable” supply, environment, finance), but the disruption “shock” from Covid-19 now dominates.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

Offshore contracting has remained at extremely low levels for a number of years, and the mobile offshore orderbook has now shrunk to less than a quarter of its peak size. Furthermore, the majority of units on order in the MDU and OSV sectors were now contracted more than five years ago. This month’s Analysis examines what’s still on the orderbook and where solutions have been found.

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

 

As Analysis in SIW 1,395 illustrated, vessel speed dynamics have been a notable part of the shipping market story over the last decade or so. With another full year of average vessel speed data to examine, it’s a good time for an update, focussing in on the trends last year in particular but also re-visiting the broader importance of tracking vessel speeds…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

2019 was a cautiously positive year for the offshore industry, with the slow journey towards market rebalancing continuing to progress in most sectors. Nonetheless, the industry continued to face substantial structural pressures, with demand growth in most vessel classes only modest and oversupply remaining an issue in almost every region.

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.