Archives for posts with tag: Clarksons Research

Investment 101 could be summarised as: buy low, sell high and make lots of money in between. That sounds simple, and with the benefit of hindsight, it can look it too. But as anyone who follows shipping knows, this is easier said than done. Modelling returns on shipping investments in the decade since the financial crisis helps to emphasize this point, and shows how good timing always makes the difference.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Oil prices have always been big news for shipping and offshore, and are currently making the headlines. Since early October, crude prices have undergone one of the lengthiest periods of steady decline on record. Whilst the steep drops from the heights of $147/bbl in 2008 and $114/bbl in 2014 were clearly more substantial as a whole, the recent downward trend is certainly noteworthy. So what’s going on?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The Middle East is a key component of global oil production. In total, it accounts for just under 25m bpd of oil output (or 30m bpd including NGLs), of which nearly a quarter is produced offshore. The Middle East also produces 63.5bn cfd of gas (64% offshore). The majority of Middle Eastern producers are OPEC members, so the group’s decisions have a large impact on production volumes in the region.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Over the ten years since the onset of the financial crisis, it has generally been tough going for the shipping markets, but not without upside at times (see SIW 1339). Today, the bulkcarrier and containership sectors look to have made some helpful progress recently while tankers are lagging behind, but looking at earnings in the major sectors across the last ten years as a whole might just tell a broader story…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

Next month over 50,000 will gather for the biennial SMM fair in Hamburg. Since the last fair (coinciding with the lowest ever ClarkSea Index!) there have been major developments, not least in environmental regulation. Despite an eroding newbuild orderbook, a modest uptick in ordering and recent enthusiasm for scrubbers are set to combine with plenty of positive discussion around technology and digitalisation!

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Economists use a range of tools to demonstrate the degree of fragmentation, consolidation, or in economic terms, ‘concentration’ across a range of industrial activity. Shipping is often thought of as a fairly fragmented industry, and the shipbuilding industry is today undergoing a period of significant consolidation. How might an economics approach illustrate the prevailing degree of concentration in each case?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

A common ‘rule of thumb’ statistic in shipping market analysis, in order to give an idea of prospective capacity growth, is the orderbook expressed as a percentage of the existing fleet. Today, at a global fleet level, that figure stands at a historically relatively low level in dwt terms (10%), but what does that actually tell us? This week’s Analysis takes a look at the pros and cons of this widely used statistic.

 

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.