Archives for posts with tag: China

Relations between the US and China have been back in the headlines recently, with tensions seemingly on the rise once more. For the shipping industry, the US-China ‘trade war’ was one of the key issues of 2018-19, and the ‘phase one’ trade deal in early 2020 was an encouraging sign that US-China trade could pick up. But with Covid-19 dominating trends in the year to date, how have volumes fared so far?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

Offshore contracting has remained at extremely low levels for a number of years, and the mobile offshore orderbook has now shrunk to less than a quarter of its peak size. Furthermore, the majority of units on order in the MDU and OSV sectors were now contracted more than five years ago. This month’s Analysis examines what’s still on the orderbook and where solutions have been found.

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

 

This weekend marks Chinese New Year, traditionally an important milestone for mainlane container shipping, representing the end of the usually quieter winter season and the chance to look ahead to potentially improving spring trade volumes. The Year of the Pig didn’t prove a highly fruitful one for mainlane trade, so container market players will be glad to see the arrival of the Year of the Rat…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

January 26th is Australia Day, a chance to celebrate all things Australian: vegemite, sporting prowess, BBQs, surfing, unusual (and frequently lethal) wildlife, digeridoos, Uluru, Kylie, Mad Max and so on. But from a shipping and seaborne trade perspective, perhaps the most relevant features of Australia are literally from the land ‘down under’, namely iron ore, coal and natural gas.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The festive season is coming closer, and for many of us the time to get the seasonal shopping done is running out. For the containership sector, however, the peak shipping season was back in the summer, giving us a chance to reflect already on how consumer and manufacturing trends have left box shipping looking back on a busy year in terms of volumes.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

A key driver of seaborne trade growth over the last two decades has been the spectacular economic rise of China. With the Chinese economy likely to gradually mature, the idea of the “next China” for shipping has been often discussed, and India has often been put forward in this context. There are many factors to consider, but in any evaluation of this possibility, trends in India’s energy sector are highly significant.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Shipping industry cycles are constantly influenced by the twin factors of supply and demand, and for investors if it’s not time to worry about one, it’s the other that’s causing concern. With much of the post-financial crisis era focussed on supply-side issues, albeit following a huge shock to demand, risks to seaborne trade growth began to feature more prominently in recent years, but how do things look today?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

Container shipping is often thought of as the ‘glue’ which keeps the world economy turning, providing a low unit cost way of moving both manufactures and a range of other goods between producers and consumers around the world. As such, container ports and terminals are crucial nodes in the world’s transportation system, and their sheer number and ubiquity merits a close look.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

By the late 1800s, the shipping industry had been transformed by the introduction of steam power and iron ships. Coal and grain were two of the most important cargoes, alongside timber, sugar, cotton and tea. While technology, the sheer scale of the business, and the global cargo mix, have of course all changed since then, dry bulk cargoes have retained a position at the heart of global seaborne trade.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The Wall Street Crash in 1929 marked the onset of the Great Depression in the US. Times were tough, but jazz music, which had taken off in the 1920s, endured and evolved into the era of big bands and swing music now synonymous with the 1930s. The crude tanker sector is having a tricky time of its own at present, but over the last decade, crude trade patterns have seen their own evolutionary swing…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.