Archives for posts with tag: bulkers

In this week’s analysis, we again update shipping’s mid-year report, reviewing progress across a range of shipping sector “subjects”. Our overall ClarkSea Index increased 8% y-o-y in the first half, to move marginally above the trend since the financial crisis. However while some “subjects” still achieve an “A” for effort, others might have to “repeat a year” unless they sit additional classes over the summer!

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

One of the most important building blocks of shipping market economics is the concept of the ‘delivered cost’ of a commodity and freight’s part within it. In general, the freight element of the cost of delivering (i.e. selling from the point of origin and shipping to the buyer) of a commodity is only a limited part of the total delivered cost. This has key implications for shipping market behaviour.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Once in a while, one of the many statistics regularly updated in Shipping Intelligence Weekly reaches a major milestone, and this month we have a significant one to reflect upon. As of May 2019, for the very first time we have been able to report on a global shipping fleet comprising over 2 billion deadweight tonnes in capacity. This week’s Analysis reviews the progress from the first billion dwt to the second…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Climate change experts have recently estimated that the last four years have been the hottest on record, but in shipping it feels like a different matter altogether. As a whole the markets do appear to have seen some further gradual improvement in 2018, but without heating up too much. But do wider readings of the shipping ‘temperature’ tell us anything more?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The last few months have seen increasing friction surrounding trade globally, with the US and China in particular making headlines for announcing proposals to introduce new import tariffs. These developments have raised concerns over a potential negative impact on seaborne trade volumes, but how much trade could actually be affected? The devil is in the detail, so this week’s Analysis takes a closer look…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

From one viewpoint, given the huge range of companies involved, the ownership of the world fleet can look quite fragmented. But from another, the prominence of larger owners who account for the majority of tonnage is quite clear too. Upon closer inspection however, some sectors appear proportionally more likely to be home to the bigger, more diversified players than others.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

In June 2016, the ‘Neo-Panamax’ locks at the Panama Canal opened to commercial traffic, enabling a much larger proportion of the world’s fleet to transit the canal. Nearly two years on, official dimension restrictions at the Neo-Panamax locks are being amended, with an even greater share of the fleet theoretically capable of passing through the canal from 1st June onwards.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.