Archives for posts with tag: bulkers

It’s the time of year when many of us are in a race to conclude our purchases in time for the holiday season, but shipowners have been busy shopping throughout the year. Both newbuild and secondhand spending have been on the rise, as notable ‘pent-up’ demand combined with attractive markets in many sectors has increased owners’ appetite for tonnage.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The world shipping fleet has grown by >39,000 vessels since start 2000, and by >6,000 in the last 5 years (expanding by 7%, and 17% in GT). However, growing vessel numbers has not been a uniform trend across maritime. Notably, key offshore sectors are seeing unit numbers drop, and some shipping segments have also seen numbers ease. Here we take a closer look, and consider some of the drivers.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Covid-19 has created some huge challenges for the shipping industry, but the shipping markets have seen an impressive rebound and notable “disruption upside”. Since the onset of the pandemic we’ve reported on some extraordinary market dynamics, including some spectacular earnings this year and major asset price swings. This week we put this in the context of returns seen on pre-crisis investments.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

A year on from peak trade disruption, we update our half year report for the shipping industry profiling a strong recovery and some exceptional individual markets. While previous years’ reports have mentioned “must do better” or “extra classes needed”, even the toughest of examiners would congratulate (tankers aside!?) shipping’s economic performance during the many continued challenges of the pandemic.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Earlier this year (see SIW 1,467) we reported on our cross-segment ClarkSea Index laying down a new marker, with the average in Q1 the strongest for over a decade. Since then, with positive sentiment enduring in many shipping sectors, progress has continued and we now have another milestone to report: in May-21, the ClarkSea Index averaged its highest level since Sep-08, before the financial crisis.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Through 2020 our Analysis regularly looked at latest “near-term” shipping demand indicators, first to assess the magnitude of the initial Covid-19 impact and disruption, and then to track improvements in activity and seaborne trade, as volumes recovered in a number of sectors with some of the negative impacts easing back. This week we take a fresh look at the latest readings to check up on recent progress.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

As the shipping industry embarks upon an unprecedented programme of investment and fleet renewal in order to meet emissions targets, we have been profiling progress so far in the uptake of Alternative Fuels, ESTs, “Eco” engines, scrubbers and port facilities (see SIW 1,450, 1,452). This week we drill down on progress in the bulkcarrier sector, a segment accounting for a significant 35% of global fleet tonnage. .

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

After a uniquely challenging year for the shipping industry, our first Analysis of the year reviews some of the dramatic trends from a Covid-19 dominated 2020. Benefiting from elements of “disruption upside”, our cross-segment ClarkSea Index actually ended the year down only 2% y-o-y, experiencing its second highest year since 2010 (after 2019) despite global seaborne trade falling 3.8% to 11.5bn tonnes.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

30 years is a long time in any sphere, and an even longer time in a fast-paced industry like shipping. The markets of the 1980s seem dim and distant, with a heroic boom and a few crises in between. However, one thing today looks similar: the “classic” orderbook as a percentage of the fleet ratio, a yardstick for assessing future supply growth, is now, at 7.4%, as low as it has been since 1989.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

While indicators suggest that the impact of Covid-19 on global seaborne trade may have eased a little in recent months (see SIW 1,433), this year overall has undoubtedly been a very difficult period for seaborne demand. However, whilst imports into many regions have decreased significantly, demand in China, shipping’s largest market, has remained robust, with imports recently reaching record highs.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.