Archives for posts with tag: Bulker

2018 looks set to be a good year for ABBA fans, after the Swedish pop group announced plans to release their first new songs since the 1980s. With the band’s greatest hits album back in the charts again, it’s clear there’s still appetite for recycling old classics. In shipping’s recycling market, meanwhile, 2018 has seen volumes remain elevated, but with different ship types having stepped into the spotlight.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

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In the old song “It’s a long way to Tipperary”, the Irish county in question is “a long way back home”. For shipping it must feel a little like that too. Despite more positive sentiment, a supportive world economy, robust trade growth and slowing capacity expansion in many sectors, truly strong markets might still seem in many cases some distance away. But how far along the way are the shipping markets really?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The economist John Maynard Keynes famously commented that “In the long run we are all dead”, and for shipping market players waiting for cyclical markets to improve it might sometimes feel like that. But with two of the previously long-suffering sectors enjoying better times recently, how do the improved market conditions impact on a long-term view of performance?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

The shipping industry is essential to the smooth functioning of the world economy, transporting around 85% of the world’s international trade in tonnage terms. So it comes as no surprise that ships are all over the world at any given time. However, the ability to identify ships’ positions by vessel tracking systems today means that one can be more precise than ever in breaking this down a little further…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

In 1896, Wilbur and Orville Wright began to experiment with flight in their bicycle shop in Dayton, Ohio. But it was another seven years until the brothers successfully flew the world’s first powered aeroplane, with the maiden flight lasting just 12 seconds. Today’s bulkcarrier owners, holding out for loftier earnings, would likely empathise; getting airborne, and staying there, is a real challenge.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

The Economist’s ‘Big Mac’ Index is a well-known comparison of the relative cost of an item (in this case the ubiquitous burger) in different countries, once the local currency has been converted into US dollars, to provide an indication of the cost of living in various places around the world. In shipping, largely, the dollar rules, but investors still need ways of measuring the cost of potential returns…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

January 26th is Australia Day, a chance to celebrate all things Australian: vegemite, sporting prowess, BBQs, surfing, unusual (and frequently lethal) wildlife, digeridoos, Uluru, Kylie, Mad Max and so on. But from a shipping and seaborne trade perspective, perhaps the most relevant features of Australia are literally from the land ‘down under’, namely iron ore, coal and natural gas.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.