Archives for posts with tag: Bulker

Investment 101 could be summarised as: buy low, sell high and make lots of money in between. That sounds simple, and with the benefit of hindsight, it can look it too. But as anyone who follows shipping knows, this is easier said than done. Modelling returns on shipping investments in the decade since the financial crisis helps to emphasize this point, and shows how good timing always makes the difference.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation, better known as HSBC, for a number of years proudly claimed to be “the world’s local bank”. The shipping industry is well-known for keeping the wheels of the global trade turning, but, like the famous old bank, it could also be said to be the “world’s local” business too, integral to regional and local economic networks.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Every year, readers of the Shipping Intelligence Weekly are invited to submit their predictions of the value of the ClarkSea Index at the start of November the following year. Of course, forecasting anything in an industry as volatile as shipping is always a challenge, but with a prize of a case of champagne at stake, many of our readers are eager to give it a go. So, how did last year’s entrants get on?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

Over the ten years since the onset of the financial crisis, it has generally been tough going for the shipping markets, but not without upside at times (see SIW 1339). Today, the bulkcarrier and containership sectors look to have made some helpful progress recently while tankers are lagging behind, but looking at earnings in the major sectors across the last ten years as a whole might just tell a broader story…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

This week, the US announced that further tariffs on a wide range of imports from China will come into force from Monday, with China confirming retaliatory measures. These developments represent an escalation in the dispute over trade between the two countries, and against this backdrop, it is worth taking another look (see SIW 1327) at the potential impact of tariffs announced this year in a shipping context.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The summer of 2018 has been a scorcher! Now that suits some people pretty well of course, but if you happen to be, say, a phlegmatic British shipping analyst sizzling away in the City of London, this sort of heat can leave you pining for the cold and wet to which you are accustomed. So in a spirit of escapism, this week’s Analysis uses Clarksons SeaNet data to take a look at activity in the lovely, chilly north…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Economists use a range of tools to demonstrate the degree of fragmentation, consolidation, or in economic terms, ‘concentration’ across a range of industrial activity. Shipping is often thought of as a fairly fragmented industry, and the shipbuilding industry is today undergoing a period of significant consolidation. How might an economics approach illustrate the prevailing degree of concentration in each case?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.