Archives for posts with tag: Bulker

The US has traditionally been one of the most significant importers of energy commodities globally, given its large population’s heavy demand for energy (12.8 MWh/capita in 2016, treble that of China). However, US seaborne energy imports peaked in 2005, and more recently exports have taken off, owing to the shale boom. This led to the US becoming a net seaborne exporter of energy commodities in 2018.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Environmental concerns are increasingly to the fore in world political economy, with the global energy mix and questions of “peak demand” for different fossil fuels receiving increasing attention as a result. While there is clearly still much uncertainty around this topic, it is worth exploring how shipping continues to develop alongside the changing dynamics of the global energy mix.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

It is often noted that the shipping market’s component parts make it ‘multi-cyclical’, helpful in an industry where the number of variables is large and volatility prevalent. It seems like this view is a reasonable assumption: at any given time one or more markets may be under pressure but equally circumstances are likely to be favouring other markets at the same time. But how to test it?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Sale and purchase has long been a central part of the shipping markets, and with 13,800 units reported sold secondhand across the shipping and offshore sectors over the last decade, this clearly remains the case. In fact, 2017 was a record year for S&P volumes with 2018 not too far behind. A range of factors influence secondhand transaction volumes; comparing ‘liquidity’ across sectors highlights some of these.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

“Going the extra mile” has become a classic part of “business-speak”, but in the shipping business it can have a more literal meaning. Distance plays a huge role in determining the impact of trade flows on vessel demand, and is therefore a key variable in the shipping market equation. Tracking the changes in the distances covered by seaborne trade is an important element of the demand-side framework.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The first quarter of the year is often a seasonally weak period for the shipping markets, and 2019 so far has proved no exception. Although the ClarkSea Index has risen by 13% y-o-y so far this year, it still fell by over 30% from multi-year highs in late 2018 to below $10,000/day by mid-February. Against a backdrop of building demand risks, how severe has this year’s seasonal slide been in a historical context?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

In 2018 the ClarkSea Index had a very strong Q4, with the average in the final quarter well above that registered across the first three. It’s well known that shipping markets can be seasonal, and studying our ClarkSea Index illustrates that fairly well. But how seasonal actually are they, how far did last year’s Q4 stand out, and how much does a strong Q4 tell us about the year to come?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.