In this week’s analysis, we again update shipping’s mid-year report, reviewing progress across a range of shipping sector “subjects”. Our overall ClarkSea Index increased 8% y-o-y in the first half, to move marginally above the trend since the financial crisis. However while some “subjects” still achieve an “A” for effort, others might have to “repeat a year” unless they sit additional classes over the summer!

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

In recent years, much attention has focussed on the major changes that have been taking place in crude trade patterns, including the recent growth in long-haul trade. However, whilst perhaps less-heralded, seaborne oil products trade has also put in a strong performance, after growth began to accelerate from 2004 onwards. In total, products have accounted for 73% of all seaborne oil trade growth 2004-18.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

There are a range of indicators that can be used to gauge activity in the subsea segment of the offshore industry, including the number of tree awards, the EPC/SURF contractor work backlog and subsea support vessel utilisation trends, for example. Another is the backlog of subsea trees on order at tree fabricators. So where is this indicator now and what might it suggest about the subsea sector generally?

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

Shipping and energy are two central features of the modern globalised economy. Indeed, in 2019 total seaborne trade is projected to exceed 12bn tonnes, while primary energy demand is expected to stand at over 14bn tonnes of oil equivalent: around 1.6 tonnes of seaborne trade and 1.8 toe of energy for everyone on the planet. What is the relationship between these salient features of global economic activity?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

Over the last year or so, it has been clear that risks to the seaborne demand environment have been increasing. While there are still plenty of positive drivers, a number of headwinds have clearly developed, and projections for seaborne trade growth in 2019 have been revised downwards since the start of the year. What factors are having the biggest impact, and where have revisions been most pronounced?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

This year, the shipping industry is expected to transport 12bn tonnes of cargo. That’s double the volume shipped in 2000 and four times the trade in 1980; the result of economic growth and globalisation. Dry bulk and container trade were at the heart of this in the boom of the 2000s, but both over time and across sectors the seaborne trade growth environment continues to evolve.

 

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

One of the most important building blocks of shipping market economics is the concept of the ‘delivered cost’ of a commodity and freight’s part within it. In general, the freight element of the cost of delivering (i.e. selling from the point of origin and shipping to the buyer) of a commodity is only a limited part of the total delivered cost. This has key implications for shipping market behaviour.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.