2018 so far has been a year of firming oil prices. Despite continued strong output growth from US shale, the crude price has risen, with Brent even topping $80/bbl, fuelled by political risk: Venezuelan instability, North Korea and sanctions on Iran. Supply outages, plus higher prices muting demand, have hit the tanker market. However, the flip side has been more positive indications (at last) in the offshore sector.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

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Brazil’s offshore sector has faced various challenges in recent years but nevertheless still accounts for 11% of all offshore oil production, 20% of all ultra-deepwater fields and 23% of FPSO deployments globally. It also still has significant untapped potential, or at least so many international oil companies seem to think, if the results of the country’s most recent offshore block licensing rounds are any guide.

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

In June 2016, the ‘Neo-Panamax’ locks at the Panama Canal opened to commercial traffic, enabling a much larger proportion of the world’s fleet to transit the canal. Nearly two years on, official dimension restrictions at the Neo-Panamax locks are being amended, with an even greater share of the fleet theoretically capable of passing through the canal from 1st June onwards.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

As the shipping community begins to gather for Posidonia, this week’s analysis reviews the market leading position of Greek owners. Ten years on from the financial crisis, Greek owners have expanded their control of the world fleet from a 13% to 17% share, today operating some 218m GT (370m dwt) valued at USD 105 billion. Certainly worth raising a glass (or two) while enjoying the parties and cocktails!

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Global seaborne trade has nearly doubled since the turn of the century and in the consensus view, looks likely to continue on an upwards path in the long term. One important element of this trend is rising per capita trade as the world becomes wealthier. But where, exactly, might further per capita seaborne trade growth come from? The concept of an economic ‘tipping point’ and a few examples can be helpful here.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

2018 looks set to be a good year for ABBA fans, after the Swedish pop group announced plans to release their first new songs since the 1980s. With the band’s greatest hits album back in the charts again, it’s clear there’s still appetite for recycling old classics. In shipping’s recycling market, meanwhile, 2018 has seen volumes remain elevated, but with different ship types having stepped into the spotlight.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

In the old song “It’s a long way to Tipperary”, the Irish county in question is “a long way back home”. For shipping it must feel a little like that too. Despite more positive sentiment, a supportive world economy, robust trade growth and slowing capacity expansion in many sectors, truly strong markets might still seem in many cases some distance away. But how far along the way are the shipping markets really?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.