The last few years have marked a particularly challenging period for the shipbuilding industry, with contracting activity generally remaining limited and many yards facing difficulties. However, focusing on those builders which have been able to take contracts reveals one interesting angle, with the volume of orders per yard heading upwards, driven by both longer term trends and more recent changes.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The Middle East Gulf, which laps the shores of several major OPEC countries, holds 32% of the world’s 60 largest offshore oil fields, some of which have been active for 60 years. But though it is a mature area, in 2018 it is still projected to account for 28% and 34% of global offshore oil and gas production, with output having been supported by a large number of expansion, EOR and redevelopment projects.

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

The Middle East is a key component of global oil production. In total, it accounts for just under 25m bpd of oil output (or 30m bpd including NGLs), of which nearly a quarter is produced offshore. The Middle East also produces 63.5bn cfd of gas (64% offshore). The majority of Middle Eastern producers are OPEC members, so the group’s decisions have a large impact on production volumes in the region.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

There is a sense that the LNG sector is now gaining some momentum compared to recent years: LNG carrier market sentiment has picked up with firming ordering and dayrates; several major LNG project FIDs look to be near; and the approach of IMO 2020 has made LNG as a marine fuel highly topical. Against this backdrop, interest in ‘small-scale’ LNG is appreciable too. But just what is small-scale LNG?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Over the ten years since the onset of the financial crisis, it has generally been tough going for the shipping markets, but not without upside at times (see SIW 1339). Today, the bulkcarrier and containership sectors look to have made some helpful progress recently while tankers are lagging behind, but looking at earnings in the major sectors across the last ten years as a whole might just tell a broader story…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

One of the notable features of the shipping markets in 2017 was the record level of S&P activity, with reported sales volumes topping 90m dwt in capacity and more than 1,600 units. After a slow start in early 2018, this year’s activity levels subsequently picked up, but indications suggest a slower Q3 than one year previously. Where does this leave 2018 S&P volumes against last year’s record?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Among the many specialised vessels to be found within the diverse world of shipping are Floating Production, Storage and Offloading (FPSO) units, which are used to exploit offshore oil and gas fields. Although few in number compared to say, tankers, they tend to be high-value units, and market cycles in the FPSO sector make for an interesting comparison with more conventional shipping markets.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.