Archives for category: World Offshore Register

Offshore is quite a project driven sector in the sense that work at offshore fields drives much of the demand for offshore vessels. But offshore is also project driven in the sense that offshore output growth is linked to field project start-ups. And since 28% of global oil production is offshore, the aggregate of individual offshore start-ups can potentially have significant implications for wider energy market trends…

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

The Middle East Gulf, which laps the shores of several major OPEC countries, holds 32% of the world’s 60 largest offshore oil fields, some of which have been active for 60 years. But though it is a mature area, in 2018 it is still projected to account for 28% and 34% of global offshore oil and gas production, with output having been supported by a large number of expansion, EOR and redevelopment projects.

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

The mobile offshore orderbook reached its lowest level since 2005 at the start of August. Furthermore, a significant portion has been on order for a number of years, with a large share of these units having already been launched. As uncertainty continues to cloud the future for many of these vessels, this month’s Analysis investigates the nature of the offshore orderbook in more detail.

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

Shallow water field developments can often be overshadowed by complex deepwater projects involving MOPUs and subsea trees. Yet shallow water, fixed platform developments remain a key part of the offshore sector and a significant source of vessel demand in many areas. And with some notable fixed platform project FIDs coming up, a review of this sometimes neglected segment seems timely.

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

In the broader context of firm global LNG demand growth, Australian offshore gas mega-projects have been a significant feature of the offshore sector for the last decade, driving innovation (think Prelude FLNG) and yielding rapid production growth. There are also a few projects projected to push output even higher in the short term, though against this backdrop, there are some uncertainties in the longer term.

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

Indian offshore fields used to be the main source of the natural gas consumed in India’s rapidly growing, energy-hungry economy; now however, it is LNG imports. This recent change is largely due to a decline in the country’s offshore gas output. But as part of a drive to reduce reliance on energy imports, the Indian government has been introducing policies designed to raise offshore gas production once more…

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

Since the onset of the downturn in 2014 it has been a pretty bleak few years for the offshore sector, with the occasional chinks of light on the horizon often quickly clouded over. More recently there have been indications that things might be clearing up a little and so sentiment has improved somewhat. But it is worth recalling just how low the barometer has sunk in order to put these things in perspective.

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.