Archives for category: Tankers

Connecting the Atlantic to the Pacific, the Panama Canal has been an important waterway for global shipping since the inaugural transit in 1914, and the opening of new, expanded locks in 2016 enabled larger vessels to transit. Today, vessel movements data allows us to track transits on a day-to-day basis, providing insight on specific trends at the Panama Canal, as well as at a sector and macro level.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

On a number of occasions this year (see SIW 1,475 and SIW 1,467) we have reported on our cross-segment ClarkSea Index marking new milestones, including reaching the highest level since September 2008, before the financial crisis, back in May. Since then, the ClarkSea Index has recorded even more notable gains, and at the end of August stood in the top 2% of all values recorded over the last 30 years.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Global seaborne trade has seen a strong rebound in 2021 so far; volumes were up c.4% y-o-y across Jan-July, according to our Monthly Global Seaborne Trade Indicator. However, with recent y-o-y trends distorted by significant short-term swings in trade last year, taking a look at our selection of volume indicators helps to track the progress so far on the road to regaining pre-pandemic trade levels…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

A year ago the Sale and Purchase (S&P) markets were struggling with huge Covid-19 economic uncertainty and the wide ranging logistical challenges of delivering a ship. While difficulties remain (especially around crew transfer), sales volumes have picked up to record levels with over 84m dwt of tonnage bought and sold in the first half and, in some segments, “eye-watering” asset value increases.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Earlier this year (see SIW 1,467) we reported on our cross-segment ClarkSea Index laying down a new marker, with the average in Q1 the strongest for over a decade. Since then, with positive sentiment enduring in many shipping sectors, progress has continued and we now have another milestone to report: in May-21, the ClarkSea Index averaged its highest level since Sep-08, before the financial crisis.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

A year on from the peak impact of Covid-19 on world seaborne trade, overall volumes have made a strong recovery, returning to positive year-on-year growth territory earlier this year. Following the major variations within 2020, comparing volumes so far this year to the pre-Covid period provides a useful indication of which sectors of trade have seen the firmest recovery and which still have ground to make up.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Through 2020 our Analysis regularly looked at latest “near-term” shipping demand indicators, first to assess the magnitude of the initial Covid-19 impact and disruption, and then to track improvements in activity and seaborne trade, as volumes recovered in a number of sectors with some of the negative impacts easing back. This week we take a fresh look at the latest readings to check up on recent progress.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

After a uniquely challenging year for the shipping industry, our first Analysis of the year reviews some of the dramatic trends from a Covid-19 dominated 2020. Benefiting from elements of “disruption upside”, our cross-segment ClarkSea Index actually ended the year down only 2% y-o-y, experiencing its second highest year since 2010 (after 2019) despite global seaborne trade falling 3.8% to 11.5bn tonnes.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

2020 has seen major disruption to the shipping markets and a “shock” to seaborne trade. Volumes in many sectors are now returning, but on a full year basis global seaborne trade is still set to have fallen (latest estimate: -3.6% in tonnes) . However, one underlying trade trend of recent years has sustained, with the “average haul” of seaborne trade looking set to have increased for the fifth consecutive year.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

30 years is a long time in any sphere, and an even longer time in a fast-paced industry like shipping. The markets of the 1980s seem dim and distant, with a heroic boom and a few crises in between. However, one thing today looks similar: the “classic” orderbook as a percentage of the fleet ratio, a yardstick for assessing future supply growth, is now, at 7.4%, as low as it has been since 1989.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.