Archives for category: Tankers

Through 2020 our Analysis regularly looked at latest “near-term” shipping demand indicators, first to assess the magnitude of the initial Covid-19 impact and disruption, and then to track improvements in activity and seaborne trade, as volumes recovered in a number of sectors with some of the negative impacts easing back. This week we take a fresh look at the latest readings to check up on recent progress.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

After a uniquely challenging year for the shipping industry, our first Analysis of the year reviews some of the dramatic trends from a Covid-19 dominated 2020. Benefiting from elements of “disruption upside”, our cross-segment ClarkSea Index actually ended the year down only 2% y-o-y, experiencing its second highest year since 2010 (after 2019) despite global seaborne trade falling 3.8% to 11.5bn tonnes.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

2020 has seen major disruption to the shipping markets and a “shock” to seaborne trade. Volumes in many sectors are now returning, but on a full year basis global seaborne trade is still set to have fallen (latest estimate: -3.6% in tonnes) . However, one underlying trade trend of recent years has sustained, with the “average haul” of seaborne trade looking set to have increased for the fifth consecutive year.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

30 years is a long time in any sphere, and an even longer time in a fast-paced industry like shipping. The markets of the 1980s seem dim and distant, with a heroic boom and a few crises in between. However, one thing today looks similar: the “classic” orderbook as a percentage of the fleet ratio, a yardstick for assessing future supply growth, is now, at 7.4%, as low as it has been since 1989.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

While indicators suggest that the impact of Covid-19 on global seaborne trade may have eased a little in recent months (see SIW 1,433), this year overall has undoubtedly been a very difficult period for seaborne demand. However, whilst imports into many regions have decreased significantly, demand in China, shipping’s largest market, has remained robust, with imports recently reaching record highs.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Covid-19 has led to a major “shock” to the shipping markets, and tracking the impacts has brought a range of metrics, including new “near-term” data, into close focus (see our Shipping Market Impact Tracker on SIN). One statistic, however, which has not received quite so much attention this year has been average vessel speed, but with half of the year completed it’s a good time for an update.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Covid-19 has led to a major “shock” to seaborne activity, and we are tracking a range of metrics (see Shipping Intelligence Network) that show the immediate demand side impact in varying ways. However, inevitably some focus has also turned to the shape of the potential future recovery – there are clearly many scenarios, and a growing debate, so a framework for further analysis is a useful step.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

That recent times have been a good demonstration of shipping market volatility comes as no surprise. There have been more than enough major events to drive significant fluctuations in our ClarkSea Index, and the statistics make this clear. Developments in the tanker sector have recently dominated the index trend in terms of volatility, but that doesn’t mean that every sector has followed quite the same storyline… 

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Covid-19 has highlighted how aggregate port call data, whilst sometimes imperfect, can be useful. Regular analysis of daily port calls trends in key countries (see our ‘Port Call Activity Tracker’ in the Covid-19 Reports section on Shipping Intelligence Network) is helping us track the impact of the pandemic, and a broader look at port call data also provides context for understanding the disruption to global shipping.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Last week’s Analysis took a long-term view of seaborne trade. This week, we look at the history of global oil demand, a key driver of seaborne trade (crude and products trade totalled 62m bpd last year, 25% of the total in tonnes), offshore oil production (25m bpd), and oil prices. In 2020, the now global spread of Covid-19 is leading to major disruption to oil demand, and the ‘long’ view provides an interesting context.
Shipping Intelligence Network.