Archives for category: shipping

The summer of 2018 has been a scorcher! Now that suits some people pretty well of course, but if you happen to be, say, a phlegmatic British shipping analyst sizzling away in the City of London, this sort of heat can leave you pining for the cold and wet to which you are accustomed. So in a spirit of escapism, this week’s Analysis uses Clarksons SeaNet data to take a look at activity in the lovely, chilly north…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

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Economists use a range of tools to demonstrate the degree of fragmentation, consolidation, or in economic terms, ‘concentration’ across a range of industrial activity. Shipping is often thought of as a fairly fragmented industry, and the shipbuilding industry is today undergoing a period of significant consolidation. How might an economics approach illustrate the prevailing degree of concentration in each case?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Since 1.73m bpd of oil output cuts were orchestrated by OPEC in November 2016, oil prices have risen from under $50/bbl to $70-$80/bbl, stimulating the upstream sector but making for a gloomy backdrop to challenged tanker markets in the last 18 months. With this context in mind and following the latest OPEC meeting, it is worth looking in detail at some of the ways OPEC policy has been influencing oil markets…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

2018 so far has been a year of firming oil prices. Despite continued strong output growth from US shale, the crude price has risen, with Brent even topping $80/bbl, fuelled by political risk: Venezuelan instability, North Korea and sanctions on Iran. Supply outages, plus higher prices muting demand, have hit the tanker market. However, the flip side has been more positive indications (at last) in the offshore sector.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

In June 2016, the ‘Neo-Panamax’ locks at the Panama Canal opened to commercial traffic, enabling a much larger proportion of the world’s fleet to transit the canal. Nearly two years on, official dimension restrictions at the Neo-Panamax locks are being amended, with an even greater share of the fleet theoretically capable of passing through the canal from 1st June onwards.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

2018 looks set to be a good year for ABBA fans, after the Swedish pop group announced plans to release their first new songs since the 1980s. With the band’s greatest hits album back in the charts again, it’s clear there’s still appetite for recycling old classics. In shipping’s recycling market, meanwhile, 2018 has seen volumes remain elevated, but with different ship types having stepped into the spotlight.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Across the spectrum of seaborne trade, crude oil and containers could hardly be more different. The former is the classic raw material commodity, whilst the latter represents the shipping of all sorts of manufactured end products. Yet in 2017, total seaborne trade in each stood less than 170 million tonnes apart, with a combined volume of 3.8 billion tonnes accounting for 33% of overall global seaborne trade.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.