Archives for category: Shipbuilding

In these extraordinary times, the cancellation of school exams has been one of many unprecedented events. As we examine performance in our half year report, this is not an option for the shipping industry as it battles through the many challenges (and some upside) that Covid-19 has brought: a severe 5.6% drop in seaborne trade; a 10% drop in port activity; sharp declines in demolition and newbuild ordering.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The Covid-19 pandemic has led to disruption across almost every sector of the shipping industry, and in this week’s Analysis we look at impacts in the ship repair market. After a positive 2019, yard closures, logistical difficulties and survey deferrals have all impacted activity levels while scrubber retrofitting has also declined sharply. Despite the immediate challenges, longer term prospects may be more positive.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

With Covid-19 generating major disruption to the world economy and shipping industry, in recent weeks our Analysis has often focussed on demand side “shocks”. However, a range of supply-side impacts are also taking place, with key metrics changing rapidly. Activity is down across shipyard output, newbuild ordering and vessel demolition, with the risk profile evolving as the impact of the pandemic has spread.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Even for an industry used to disruption events, the impact of Covid-19 has been dramatic. Extracted from our upcoming Shipping Review & Outlook (SRO), our Analysis this week covers some of the underlying trends we have discussed previously (ClarkSea, global trade, energy transition, “manageable” supply, environment, finance), but the disruption “shock” from Covid-19 now dominates.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

Conditions in the offshore sector have been notably challenging since the oil price crash of 2014. One particularly stark symptom of the downturn has been the long slowdown in the pace of delivery of offshore assets. Although this has offered some supply-side support, it has provided a clear sign, even after some market improvements, of quite how sustained the impact from a prolonged downturn can be.

 

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

After five years of declining output, global shipyard output increased marginally in 2019, to 32.8m CGT. However, the recovery in ordering since 2016 reversed, with contracting down 30% despite an improving earnings environment (ClarkSea Index up 24%), underlying demand for tonnage to meet global trade (11.9bn tonnes in 2019) and fleet replacement (23% of tonnage over 15 years).

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Containership earnings made progress through most of 2019, although improvements were heavily weighted towards the larger size segments. Meanwhile, the box freight market generally proved challenging for operators, with limited headway in terms of spot rates, and on average charter market levels were actually fairly similar to 2018. A mixed picture, so what do the annual statistics show?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

The final year of the decade saw further improvements across the shipping markets with a 24% increase in our ClarkSea Index taking it to its highest level since 2010, principally driven by gains in the tanker and gas segments. Meanwhile the impact of “headline” growth in seaborne trade (1.1% to 11.9bn tonnes) and world fleet (4.1% to 2.1bn dwt) were supplemented by IMO 2020 related “adjustments”.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

As we close in on the end of the decade, this week’s analysis compares data from shipping’s last forty years. It’s certainly been a tough decade, much of it spent dealing with the aftermath of the financial crisis and working through shipping’s surplus capacity. But it’s been far from a “dead decade”: trade growth of 3.7bn tonnes, 1.2bn dwt of deliveries and an improving ClarkSea Index as we close out…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

In 2019, the shipping markets as a whole appear to have ‘warmed’ for the third consecutive year, and some key markets have sizzled at certain points. But at the same time it has been a different story in terms of fresh asset investment. Pulling the two elements together to take a wider reading of the shipping ‘temperature’ can help put this year into perspective…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.