Archives for category: Seaborne Trade

Powered by ongoing innovation, drilling activity and infrastructure projects, the US energy revolution seems to be continuing apace, with the country likely to become a consistent net crude oil exporter within a few years. But as the recent FID at the 15.6 mtpa Golden Pass LNG plant in Texas suggests, seaborne LNG trade is being significantly affected by the shale boom in the US’s vast interior too…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Building trade tension between the US and China featured heavily in the headlines in 2018, driving concerns over the possible impact of the ‘trade war’. Both countries imposed new tariffs on a wide range of goods during the year (see SIW 1340 for discussion of the ‘shipping context’), but how has the seaborne trade environment actually been impacted by the dispute?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Across the global seaborne trade spectrum, crude oil is generally seen as a fairly mature element, and average growth of not much more than 1% p.a. across the period since the financial crisis appears to back that up. But in that period there have also been dynamics at play which have had a major impact on tanker demand patterns, and on closer inspection it has not been the slow lane all the way either…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

It has been a long and often arduous journey for the car carrier sector over the last ten years. However, following a very challenging 2016, last year saw a return to more positive trends in global seaborne car trade, and volumes look set to have expanded steadily in 2018 too. Nevertheless, following gradual market improvements this year, building demand side risks may represent hazards on the road ahead.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Shipping analysts spend plenty of time assessing the merits of the capacity in the fleet and the volume of seaborne trade. However, there’s another important aspect of the shipping industry which also tells us something important about market activity. Ports and port calls are the joints that hold the trade network together, the origins and destinations of cargoes and the key locations for the ships that carry them.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

Seaborne LNG trade is playing an increasingly significant role in the internationalisation of the natural gas marketplace, a process with many facets including the changing global energy mix, LNG infrastructure projects and technology such as shale gas, FLNG, and FSRU. This week’s Analysis focuses on the key trends, which are covered in more detail in the recently published LNG Trade & Transport 2018.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Global seaborne trade has nearly doubled since the turn of the century and in the consensus view, looks likely to continue on an upwards path in the long term. One important element of this trend is rising per capita trade as the world becomes wealthier. But where, exactly, might further per capita seaborne trade growth come from? The concept of an economic ‘tipping point’ and a few examples can be helpful here.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.