Archives for category: Seaborne Trade

Through 2020 our Analysis regularly looked at latest “near-term” shipping demand indicators, first to assess the magnitude of the initial Covid-19 impact and disruption, and then to track improvements in activity and seaborne trade, as volumes recovered in a number of sectors with some of the negative impacts easing back. This week we take a fresh look at the latest readings to check up on recent progress.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

In terms of world seaborne trade, 2020 will no doubt be remembered for the “shock” from the Covid-19 pandemic. But that won’t tell the whole story; this year has also been notable for major short-term swings, with volumes in some sectors rebounding firmly despite the disruption and uncertainties. This week we revisit our monthly ‘basket’ trade growth indicator (see SIW 1,433 in July) to track progress.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

This year so far has seen major disruption to seaborne trade volumes from the Covid-19 pandemic (see SIW 1,443), but significant trends have also been apparent on the supply side. Despite underlying fleet growth, trends in floating storage, scrubber retrofitting, and ‘idle’ boxship capacity have led to sometimes dramatic developments in ‘active’ fleet capacity in the major sectors over recent months.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Back in April (see SIW 1,418), aggregate port call data helped our “near-term” assessment of the size of the initial “shock” and disruption to shipping market activity from the Covid-19 pandemic. Across the following six months, the data has formed part of our tracking of the ongoing impact (see our ‘Port Call Activity Tracker’ on SIN), and continues to provide context and framework.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

In these extraordinary times, the cancellation of school exams has been one of many unprecedented events. As we examine performance in our half year report, this is not an option for the shipping industry as it battles through the many challenges (and some upside) that Covid-19 has brought: a severe 5.6% drop in seaborne trade; a 10% drop in port activity; sharp declines in demolition and newbuild ordering.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Relations between the US and China have been back in the headlines recently, with tensions seemingly on the rise once more. For the shipping industry, the US-China ‘trade war’ was one of the key issues of 2018-19, and the ‘phase one’ trade deal in early 2020 was an encouraging sign that US-China trade could pick up. But with Covid-19 dominating trends in the year to date, how have volumes fared so far?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

In our March semi-annual report, we cited satellite imagery of reduced pollution as economic activity slowed as a “stark reminder of climate change”. In this week’s Analysis, we look at some of the challenges (and opportunities) the shipping industry potentially faces with its cargo base, changes in offshore activity and in reducing its own emissions footprint through fuel transition, technology and regulation.

For the full version of this article, please go to
Shipping Intelligence Network

As observed in our Shipping Market Impact Assessment (see SIN), some sectors of economic and seaborne activity are more heavily exposed to the impacts of Covid-19 than others. Previous Analysis has, for example, focussed on global oil demand (SIW 1417), and here we consider the effects on global container trade, the magnitude in a historical context, and the potential nature of the impact as it develops.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Last week’s Analysis took a long-term view of seaborne trade. This week, we look at the history of global oil demand, a key driver of seaborne trade (crude and products trade totalled 62m bpd last year, 25% of the total in tonnes), offshore oil production (25m bpd), and oil prices. In 2020, the now global spread of Covid-19 is leading to major disruption to oil demand, and the ‘long’ view provides an interesting context.
Shipping Intelligence Network.

Shipping and energy are two central features of the modern globalised economy. Indeed, in 2019 total seaborne trade is projected to exceed 12bn tonnes, while primary energy demand is expected to stand at over 14bn tonnes of oil equivalent: around 1.6 tonnes of seaborne trade and 1.8 toe of energy for everyone on the planet. What is the relationship between these salient features of global economic activity?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.