Archives for category: Seaborne Trade

Global seaborne trade has nearly doubled since the turn of the century and in the consensus view, looks likely to continue on an upwards path in the long term. One important element of this trend is rising per capita trade as the world becomes wealthier. But where, exactly, might further per capita seaborne trade growth come from? The concept of an economic ‘tipping point’ and a few examples can be helpful here.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

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Across the spectrum of seaborne trade, crude oil and containers could hardly be more different. The former is the classic raw material commodity, whilst the latter represents the shipping of all sorts of manufactured end products. Yet in 2017, total seaborne trade in each stood less than 170 million tonnes apart, with a combined volume of 3.8 billion tonnes accounting for 33% of overall global seaborne trade.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Sometimes in shipping, as in life, things come along that nobody really expects. US shale/tight oil production, which was barely on the radar ten years ago, seems to be one of those things. The most recent news, of US crude being unloaded in the Middle East and of output passing 1970s levels, has not come entirely out of the blue. But imagine saying ten years ago that the USA could soon be a net oil exporter…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

The festive season is coming closer, and for many of us the time to get the seasonal shopping done is running out. For the containership sector, however, the peak shipping season was back in the summer, giving us a chance to reflect already on how consumer and manufacturing trends have left box shipping looking back on a busy year in terms of volumes.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Shipping industry cycles are constantly influenced by the twin factors of supply and demand, and for investors if it’s not time to worry about one, it’s the other that’s causing concern. With much of the post-financial crisis era focussed on supply-side issues, albeit following a huge shock to demand, risks to seaborne trade growth began to feature more prominently in recent years, but how do things look today?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

A well-known football manager once commented on the “bouncebackability” of his team after they had followed a defeat with a victory. This year and last, global seaborne trade growth, following a weaker performance in 2015, has illustrated its ability to bounce back strongly, and on the back of a range of positive trends is currently expected to reach close to 4% in full year 2017.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The world of seaborne trade spreads across a wide range of commodities and goods. But in terms of growth, at any point in time some elements look overweight or underweight compared to their share of trade in total. And once distance by sea comes into the equation, things can be even more complex. This week’s Analysis examines the tale of the scales since the downturn of 2009.

 

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.