Archives for category: Other

As the pace of growth in Chinese seaborne imports has slowed, and prospects for a return to stronger rates of expansion appear to have diminished, focus on the potential for other countries to help provide impetus to global seaborne trade growth has increased. With an economy expanding at a robust pace, and a population close to China’s, India has increasingly featured in the spotlight.

The Big Bang

China’s dramatic growth and increased raw material demand since the turn of the century propelled world seaborne trade to new heights. By 2014, China’s imports of dry bulk goods, crude oil and oil products reached 1,850mt, 1,600mt more than in 2000. China’s industry-led development saw unparalleled growth in steel output, whilst refinery capacity and coal imports surged. But with coal demand and steel output falling, imports stalled in 2015.

A Dimmer Light?

This rapid expansion in China’s imports occurred fairly quickly, and comparison to a ‘base year’ shows that Indian imports are tracking behind China’s progression. In 2000, China’s GDP per capita stood at US$1,000, and the country’s dry bulk and oil imports topped 200mt. India reached both of these milestones in 2007, and since then, Indian imports have risen by 280mt to around 500mt, compared to China’s 950mt of extra imports between 2000 and 2009. Differing political systems and economies have clearly proved key. Industry accounts for a greater share of China’s GDP than India’s, whilst 25% of growth in the value of India’s trade in the last ten years (in both goods and services) was accounted for by the service sector, compared to 12% for China.

Reaching For The Stars

The concern for some shipping sectors is that the pace of growth in India’s import volumes already appears to be slowing, partly as targets for thermal coal self-sufficiency have undermined coal imports since mid-2015. Meanwhile, India is aiming to become a ‘global manufacturing hub’, with ambitious targets to treble steel production capacity to 300mt by 2025. However, the steel industry globally is currently under severe stress, and it is also unclear to what extent output growth may boost iron ore imports given India’s domestic ore reserves.

What Do The Skies Hold?

Nevertheless, India seems to hold plenty of potential in some areas. The outlook for imports of coking coal, crude oil and oil products still appears positive. And at a macro level, in 2015, India’s dry bulk and oil imports represented 0.4 tonnes per capita, below the global average of 1.0 tonnes per capita. Bringing India towards this level could generate significant additional import volumes.

So, the stars don’t seem to be in a hurry to line up Indian imports for growth on this explosive scale for now, with coal imports likely to fall further. But this may not be the end of the story. Growth in India’s refinery capacity, steel production, GDP and population looks set to outpace China’s in the coming years. Whilst Indian imports may not dazzle in some areas as brightly as China’s have, the shipping industry will still be hoping they may provide some sparkle in others.

SIW1217

It has been a grim start to 2016 for the bulkcarrier market, with the Baltic Dry Index sliding to new record lows on almost every day of the year so far. With a nearly constant stream of negative news continuing to emerge across each of the key dry bulk cargo sectors, it is almost as if Poseidon, the Greek god of the sea, has with his powerful trident launched a three-pronged attack.

Down To The Ocean Depths

The current depression is indeed severe. The Baltic Dry Index, a daily indicator of bulkcarrier rates, fell to its 19th consecutive record low of 317 points on 29th January. This is far below the average of 718 points in 2015, which itself was the second lowest annual average on record, and represented a year in which bulker earnings averaged around $7,000/day, little over estimated operating costs.

Surprise Attack

Of course, difficult market conditions are nothing new. Bulker earnings have been under pressure since 2011, when more than 100m dwt of deliveries kept fleet growth in double-digits. Whilst fleet growth eased to 2.4% in 2015, the slowest pace in 16 years, new demand-side pressures emerged, with dry bulk trade remaining flat last year. In Greek mythology, Poseidon’s trident had the power to cause earthquakes on earth, and there has certainly been evidence of a shake up recently. But where have each of the three prongs hit, and how sharply?

Strikes To The Core

The first earthquake is being felt in the iron ore trade, which accounts for around a third of dry bulk trade. Following rapid growth of 15% in 2014, Chinese imports eased in 2015, and expansion in iron ore trade slowed during the year (see graph). Overall, global iron ore trade is estimated to have grown by only 2% in 2015, and continued weak Chinese steel demand and the temporary closure of several major iron ore ports in January has done little to reverse this trend into 2016 so far.
The second shake up has hit trade in coal, which accounts for a quarter of dry bulk trade, very hard. Volumes declined by an estimated 5% in 2015, and the decline in volumes on the top 100 coal trade flows neared 10% y-o-y in Q3 2015, as Chinese and Indian imports fell. With several countries looking to increase reliance on clean energy sources, a major improvement in volumes seems unlikely.

Shifting The Currents

Finally, whilst the third earthquake has perhaps been less obvious than the first two, it has still had a significant impact. Growth in minor bulk trade, a diverse cargo grouping that accounts for more than a third of dry bulk trade volumes, was limited to 1% last year, owing in part to lower Chinese demand for imports of forest products, steel products, nickel ore, and various other smaller cargoes.

Stem The Tide?

So, the seas have been exceedingly stormy in the dry bulk sector. The impact from China’s economic transition is still resonating, and as yet there are few signs of an imminent improvement. As distressed conditions take their toll, hopes will be that the power of Poseidon’s trident will eventually start to ebb.

Motoring terminology has always provided shipping analysts with a wide range of vocabulary to use when describing the car carrier sector. Last year demand growth appeared to have stalled, and the indicators suggest that there hasn’t been a significant acceleration this year. With the market improvements seen back in late 2013 now seemingly eroded, what are the signs on the road today?

Trade Growth Stalling

In some ways the signals are quite clear. The road has hardly been smooth for seaborne car trade in recent years. Volumes have yet to surpass the record level of an estimated 28.5m cars in 2007, with total trade in 2015 expected to total 26.7m cars. Trade fell by more than 30% in 2009, and while volumes have recovered to some extent, and increased by a helpful 4-6% per annum in 2011-13, growth in 2014 ground to a halt. Relocation of car production limited shipments from key Asian exporters, while imports into a number of key and emerging regions were affected by economic and political disruptions.

Similar trends have imposed a ‘speed limit’ on car trade growth this year, with volumes only on track to increase by around 1% in 2015. Strong car sales in the US and Europe have helped to drive some growth, but continued expansion of vehicle output close to major and developing demand centres, combined with economic difficulties significantly limiting imports into China, Brazil and Russia, has prevented further acceleration.

Down In A Low Gear

Meanwhile, growth in the PCC (Pure Car Carrier, including Pure Car & Truck Carrier) fleet has also decelerated in recent years, easing from 5% in capacity terms in 2013 to 2% in 2014. While the majority of car carriers operate under long-term agreements, the market is still impacted by supply and demand trends, and the slowdown in fleet growth appears, with demand looking lacklustre, to have been insufficient to prevent weaker fundamentals. Charter rates for a 6,500 ceu PCTC had improved in late 2013 and into 2014, topping $26,000/day in mid-2014. However they have since come under pressure and sentiment has become more negative during 2015.

Alternative Routes?

On the investment side, however, the indicators might be suggesting something else. Following limited ordering of new car carrier capacity in 2014, owners have put their foot down and in the first ten months of 2015 ordered units of 0.25m car equivalent capacity, more than in six of the last seven years. Replacement demand appears to have driven much of this, but there has been plenty of activity at the top end of the size range, so clearly some owners still think ‘big is beautiful’ and that the road ahead seems clear.

The Traffic Report

So, the car carrier sector may have hit a rather big jam. But down another road, there’s still plenty of traffic flow. Slow lane or fast, this all needs further examination, and each year, in our Car Carrier Trade & Transport report, we look at the trends in detail. This year’s report is available on the Shipping Intelligence Network now. Have a nice day.

SIW201511

Following several years of a more cautious approach to ordering, it appears that we have entered a new phase of cruise ship investment. This summer’s activity has lifted the cruise orderbook to record levels, and the sector is hoping to take advantage of the mobility of its assets to tap the enormous potential in emerging markets.

Looking Up…

The cruise industry today appears to have once again entered a phase of rapid growth. Since the start of last year we have recorded 24 firm orders for new vessels, including 15 with capacity in excess of 3,000 passenger berths. The orderbook now consists of 41 vessels with a combined berth capacity of 120,664, equivalent to 25% of the current fleet. In the 3,000+ berth sector the orderbook is equivalent to 73% of the current fleet.

A continued focus on “mega” cruise ships is evident from the orders noted so far this year. Royal Caribbean has ordered another Quantum-Class, 4,200 passenger ship for delivery in 2019. Elsewhere, Carnival Corporation has firmed the first four of a previously announced plan for a nine-ship order. These will be the largest ships contracted by Carnival at 180,000 GT, and while not as large as the Royal Caribbean Oasis-Class ships (225,000 GT), they will have a higher total passenger capacity (6,600), giving Carnival at least a claim to having the largest cruise ships afloat.

Looking Back…

In the past 20 years we have seen three distinct phases of expansion, with the orderbook exceeding 100,000 berths in early 2001, in 2007-08 and again in 2015. The two previous peaks were followed by a sharp drop as investment in new vessels was abruptly cut off by economic slowdown in the established key markets in North America and Europe. What factors will determine whether the current phase is similarly short-lived or a more sustained phase of investment?

Looking East…

In the short-term the performance of the cruise sector will remain closely linked to that of the major “western” economies. Last year North American and European passengers accounted for 55% and 29% of the global market of 22 million respectively; these markets will continue to exert an important influence. However, the outlook may be shaped by developments further east. Thus far, relatively few of Asia’s rapidly growing middle class have been exposed to cruises, but the cruise lines believe they can develop significant demand growth in this region. In 2015 the number of mainland Chinese tourists cruising is expected to pass 1 million for the first time, and according to industry sources in 2014 the number of cruises based at a Chinese ‘home port’ grew by 9% y-o-y to 366, while another 100 cruises called at a Chinese port (up 41%).

So, the cruise sector once again seems to be in rapid expansion mode. This time, the question is whether the establishment of new Chinese brands, the deployment of vessels specifically designed for Chinese operation and further investment in Asian cruise ports could drive a more sustained phase of ship investment. Finding the answer will certainly make for an interesting itinerary. Bon voyage!