Archives for category: Offshore

The ClarkSea Index made steady progress in 2018 (+13% to $12,144/day) taking it above the average since the financial crisis. Tankers had a miserable year before being “saved” by a strong Q4, bulkers consolidated their 2017 gains and LNG finished the year on a high. Fleet growth continues to trend below 3%, with just 11% of the fleet on order, while trade growth eased and needs to be watched closely.

 

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Following the recent oil price plunge, US shale oil production growth has been in the headlines once again, this time as one of the main factors behind the latest slide in oil prices. However, it can still be tricky to appreciate just how significant US shale oil output has now become to global oil markets. Comparing this year’s surge in output against some offshore benchmarks can be helpful.

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

Oil prices have always been big news for shipping and offshore, and are currently making the headlines. Since early October, crude prices have undergone one of the lengthiest periods of steady decline on record. Whilst the steep drops from the heights of $147/bbl in 2008 and $114/bbl in 2014 were clearly more substantial as a whole, the recent downward trend is certainly noteworthy. So what’s going on?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Offshore is quite a project driven sector in the sense that work at offshore fields drives much of the demand for offshore vessels. But offshore is also project driven in the sense that offshore output growth is linked to field project start-ups. And since 28% of global oil production is offshore, the aggregate of individual offshore start-ups can potentially have significant implications for wider energy market trends…

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation, better known as HSBC, for a number of years proudly claimed to be “the world’s local bank”. The shipping industry is well-known for keeping the wheels of the global trade turning, but, like the famous old bank, it could also be said to be the “world’s local” business too, integral to regional and local economic networks.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The Middle East Gulf, which laps the shores of several major OPEC countries, holds 32% of the world’s 60 largest offshore oil fields, some of which have been active for 60 years. But though it is a mature area, in 2018 it is still projected to account for 28% and 34% of global offshore oil and gas production, with output having been supported by a large number of expansion, EOR and redevelopment projects.

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

The Middle East is a key component of global oil production. In total, it accounts for just under 25m bpd of oil output (or 30m bpd including NGLs), of which nearly a quarter is produced offshore. The Middle East also produces 63.5bn cfd of gas (64% offshore). The majority of Middle Eastern producers are OPEC members, so the group’s decisions have a large impact on production volumes in the region.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.