Archives for category: Offshore Intelligence Monthly

The year just gone was a mixed one for offshore. Incremental progress continued towards rebalancing, while some sectors saw small day rate improvements compared to 2017. Overall though, challenges persisted in an oil price environment characterised by uncertainty and volatility. Several key indicators underperformed relative to start year sentiment and the year ended on something of a negative note.

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

Following the recent oil price plunge, US shale oil production growth has been in the headlines once again, this time as one of the main factors behind the latest slide in oil prices. However, it can still be tricky to appreciate just how significant US shale oil output has now become to global oil markets. Comparing this year’s surge in output against some offshore benchmarks can be helpful.

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

Offshore is quite a project driven sector in the sense that work at offshore fields drives much of the demand for offshore vessels. But offshore is also project driven in the sense that offshore output growth is linked to field project start-ups. And since 28% of global oil production is offshore, the aggregate of individual offshore start-ups can potentially have significant implications for wider energy market trends…

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

The Middle East Gulf, which laps the shores of several major OPEC countries, holds 32% of the world’s 60 largest offshore oil fields, some of which have been active for 60 years. But though it is a mature area, in 2018 it is still projected to account for 28% and 34% of global offshore oil and gas production, with output having been supported by a large number of expansion, EOR and redevelopment projects.

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

As recent history demonstrates, if the global oil supply-demand balance moves from a deficit of supply to a surplus, or vice versa, the effect on oil prices and hence the offshore sector can be far reaching. At present, as 2019 draws nearer, oil demand and supply look to be increasingly finely balanced. However, there are still a range of uncertainties that could significantly shift the current oil supply-demand outlook.

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

The mobile offshore orderbook reached its lowest level since 2005 at the start of August. Furthermore, a significant portion has been on order for a number of years, with a large share of these units having already been launched. As uncertainty continues to cloud the future for many of these vessels, this month’s Analysis investigates the nature of the offshore orderbook in more detail.

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

Although some indicators seem to suggest that the offshore markets have now bottomed out, most segments of the ‘cradle-to-grave’ offshore fleet are still facing significant challenges, often due to persistent vessel oversupply. One more positive sector though has been FPSOs, which is largely project driven and which has been supported by a rise in FIDs. So what is the outlook for FPSO contracting to 2020?

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.