Archives for category: Gas

It is often noted that the shipping market’s component parts make it ‘multi-cyclical’, helpful in an industry where the number of variables is large and volatility prevalent. It seems like this view is a reasonable assumption: at any given time one or more markets may be under pressure but equally circumstances are likely to be favouring other markets at the same time. But how to test it?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Sale and purchase has long been a central part of the shipping markets, and with 13,800 units reported sold secondhand across the shipping and offshore sectors over the last decade, this clearly remains the case. In fact, 2017 was a record year for S&P volumes with 2018 not too far behind. A range of factors influence secondhand transaction volumes; comparing ‘liquidity’ across sectors highlights some of these.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The offshore sector has seen some impressive gas projects over the last decade, from the development of the vast South Pars/North Field to the start-up of pioneering mega-projects off Australia and the introduction of FLNGs. Accounting for 32% of total gas output, offshore gas is now a key part of the global energy mix. But similar could be said of US shale gas. So how do shale and offshore gas measure up?

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

Powered by ongoing innovation, drilling activity and infrastructure projects, the US energy revolution seems to be continuing apace, with the country likely to become a consistent net crude oil exporter within a few years. But as the recent FID at the 15.6 mtpa Golden Pass LNG plant in Texas suggests, seaborne LNG trade is being significantly affected by the shale boom in the US’s vast interior too…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

We all know shipbuilding is one of the toughest businesses around but just how tough was 2018? Well it seems the answer depends on which unit of measurement you use! Using DWT, ordering fell 14% to 77m dwt while using CGT, a better reflection of the work content of building vessels, ordering increased by 2%. On balance its seems that conditions remain challenging but still improving on the 2016 lows.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The ClarkSea Index made steady progress in 2018 (+13% to $12,144/day) taking it above the average since the financial crisis. Tankers had a miserable year before being “saved” by a strong Q4, bulkers consolidated their 2017 gains and LNG finished the year on a high. Fleet growth continues to trend below 3%, with just 11% of the fleet on order, while trade growth eased and needs to be watched closely.

 

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Climate change experts have recently estimated that the last four years have been the hottest on record, but in shipping it feels like a different matter altogether. As a whole the markets do appear to have seen some further gradual improvement in 2018, but without heating up too much. But do wider readings of the shipping ‘temperature’ tell us anything more?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.