Archives for category: Demolition

After showing admirable resilience in 2020, shipping markets performed remarkably last year as trade volume recovery, widespread congestion and modest fleet supply growth contributed to a 93% increase in our cross-segment ClarkSea Index ($28,700/day). This cash influx also supported record S&P transaction levels (145m dwt, $46bn) and the highest newbuild order volumes since 2014 (120m dwt, $107bn).

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

After stamping on the brakes in 2020, the car carrier sector is going through the gears nicely this year, and is now seeing the strongest market conditions since before the financial crisis as improved demand and ‘disruption upside’ factors have lent significant support. Detailed analysis will be available in the upcoming edition of Car Carrier Trade & Transport, but here we take a look at some of the key themes…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The world shipping fleet has grown by >39,000 vessels since start 2000, and by >6,000 in the last 5 years (expanding by 7%, and 17% in GT). However, growing vessel numbers has not been a uniform trend across maritime. Notably, key offshore sectors are seeing unit numbers drop, and some shipping segments have also seen numbers ease. Here we take a closer look, and consider some of the drivers.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Six months on from our last Shipping Review & Outlook, an encouraging market recovery has since developed into a range of exceptional market conditions. And stakeholders across maritime are balancing a focus on returning volumes and management of widespread disruption with an increasing urgency to implement regulation and policy around greenhouse gas emissions reduction.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The last few years have seen lower volumes of recycling out of the global fleet for a variety of reasons, and remarkably strong markets in some sectors, added to Covid-19 related disruption, have kept volumes subdued in 2021. However, one part of the fleet has become a more common sight at breaking yards, as tough markets, despite recent improvements, have led to increased offshore vessel scrapping.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Extracted from our upcoming Shipping Review & Outlook, this week’s Analysis profiles recovering trade volumes, an encouraging supply side, the increasingly central role of Green Transition and elements of improved sentiment. While uncertainties around the nature of recovery and pressures from the pandemic remain, our projections suggest trade will return to pre-Covid levels in 2021 and reach 12bn tonnes.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

After a uniquely challenging year for the shipping industry, our first Analysis of the year reviews some of the dramatic trends from a Covid-19 dominated 2020. Benefiting from elements of “disruption upside”, our cross-segment ClarkSea Index actually ended the year down only 2% y-o-y, experiencing its second highest year since 2010 (after 2019) despite global seaborne trade falling 3.8% to 11.5bn tonnes.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Discussion around average ship sizes usually focusses on “upsizing” in the fleet and vessel deliveries, following the entry of new classes of even larger ships into the world fleet and also new, larger designs in well-established sectors. However, tracking the average size of vessels being recycled reveals some interesting trends too, related to regulation, market and underlying fleet dynamics

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

With Covid-19 generating major disruption to the world economy and shipping industry, in recent weeks our Analysis has often focussed on demand side “shocks”. However, a range of supply-side impacts are also taking place, with key metrics changing rapidly. Activity is down across shipyard output, newbuild ordering and vessel demolition, with the risk profile evolving as the impact of the pandemic has spread.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

So often shipping market observers’ attention centres on new ships but shipping’s ongoing fuel transition has also focussed discussion on the older, often less fuel-efficient tonnage in today’s world fleet. In order to understand how the phase out of older ships might look, and estimate its potential impact in certain areas, it”s worth taking a look at the age profile of the world’s tonnage in more detail.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.