Archives for category: Containers

Every year, readers of the Shipping Intelligence Weekly are invited to submit their predictions of the value of the ClarkSea Index at the start of November the following year. Of course, forecasting anything in an industry as volatile as shipping is always a challenge, but with a prize of a case of champagne at stake, many of our readers are eager to give it a go. So, how did last year’s entrants get on?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

One of the notable features of the shipping markets in 2017 was the record level of S&P activity, with reported sales volumes topping 90m dwt in capacity and more than 1,600 units. After a slow start in early 2018, this year’s activity levels subsequently picked up, but indications suggest a slower Q3 than one year previously. Where does this leave 2018 S&P volumes against last year’s record?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

This week, the US announced that further tariffs on a wide range of imports from China will come into force from Monday, with China confirming retaliatory measures. These developments represent an escalation in the dispute over trade between the two countries, and against this backdrop, it is worth taking another look (see SIW 1327) at the potential impact of tariffs announced this year in a shipping context.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Shipping analysts spend plenty of time assessing the merits of the capacity in the fleet and the volume of seaborne trade. However, there’s another important aspect of the shipping industry which also tells us something important about market activity. Ports and port calls are the joints that hold the trade network together, the origins and destinations of cargoes and the key locations for the ships that carry them.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

Economists use a range of tools to demonstrate the degree of fragmentation, consolidation, or in economic terms, ‘concentration’ across a range of industrial activity. Shipping is often thought of as a fairly fragmented industry, and the shipbuilding industry is today undergoing a period of significant consolidation. How might an economics approach illustrate the prevailing degree of concentration in each case?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

A common ‘rule of thumb’ statistic in shipping market analysis, in order to give an idea of prospective capacity growth, is the orderbook expressed as a percentage of the existing fleet. Today, at a global fleet level, that figure stands at a historically relatively low level in dwt terms (10%), but what does that actually tell us? This week’s Analysis takes a look at the pros and cons of this widely used statistic.

 

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The container shipping sector derives many of its characteristics from the dual but separate nature of the freight and charter markets, and 2018 so far has seen some distinctly ‘two-tier’ trends in the box shipping space, with freight and charter rates experiencing a clear difference in performance. What has caused that to happen, and how likely is it to be sustained?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.