Archives for category: Container

The S&P markets have been highly active in recent years, with over 7,000 vessels sold since the start of 2014, and 2017 marking a record year in tonnage and value terms. The Analysis in SIW 1364 examined which sectors have seen large volumes, but looking at the flow of ships between owner nationalities is also illuminating, with most of the liquidity in the market linked to owners in a small number of countries.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Heavyweights in the political arena are commonly referred to as the “Big Beasts”, but the world shipping fleet has plenty of massive animals of its own. Prominent amongst these are the very large containerships including today’s ‘mega-ships’ of over 20,000 TEU, and together the ships of over 8,000 TEU in size (the ‘big beast’ benchmark back in 2000) now account for the majority of boxship fleet capacity.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

It is often noted that the shipping market’s component parts make it ‘multi-cyclical’, helpful in an industry where the number of variables is large and volatility prevalent. It seems like this view is a reasonable assumption: at any given time one or more markets may be under pressure but equally circumstances are likely to be favouring other markets at the same time. But how to test it?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Sale and purchase has long been a central part of the shipping markets, and with 13,800 units reported sold secondhand across the shipping and offshore sectors over the last decade, this clearly remains the case. In fact, 2017 was a record year for S&P volumes with 2018 not too far behind. A range of factors influence secondhand transaction volumes; comparing ‘liquidity’ across sectors highlights some of these.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The first quarter of the year is often a seasonally weak period for the shipping markets, and 2019 so far has proved no exception. Although the ClarkSea Index has risen by 13% y-o-y so far this year, it still fell by over 30% from multi-year highs in late 2018 to below $10,000/day by mid-February. Against a backdrop of building demand risks, how severe has this year’s seasonal slide been in a historical context?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

We all know shipbuilding is one of the toughest businesses around but just how tough was 2018? Well it seems the answer depends on which unit of measurement you use! Using DWT, ordering fell 14% to 77m dwt while using CGT, a better reflection of the work content of building vessels, ordering increased by 2%. On balance its seems that conditions remain challenging but still improving on the 2016 lows.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

On a full year basis, containership earnings made further progress in 2018 compared to the previous year, but in many ways it was a mixed year for the liner sector, with the freight market seeing limited improvement overall and vessel charter earnings easing back in the second half of the year. Against this backdrop, what do the end year statistics actually show us?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.