Archives for category: Clarksons

Much of the analysis of the impacts of Covid-19 has focussed on major short-term shipping market variations and also the benefits from “disruption upside”. 2021 so far has seen more positive sentiment developing across many shipping sectors, and our ClarkSea Index has laid down a new marker, registering the best Q1 average since back in 2008, before the global financial crisis.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Through 2020 our Analysis regularly looked at latest “near-term” shipping demand indicators, first to assess the magnitude of the initial Covid-19 impact and disruption, and then to track improvements in activity and seaborne trade, as volumes recovered in a number of sectors with some of the negative impacts easing back. This week we take a fresh look at the latest readings to check up on recent progress.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

As the shipping industry embarks upon an unprecedented programme of investment and fleet renewal in order to meet emissions targets, we have been profiling progress so far in the uptake of Alternative Fuels, ESTs, “Eco” engines, scrubbers and port facilities (see SIW 1,450, 1,452). This week we drill down on progress in the bulkcarrier sector, a segment accounting for a significant 35% of global fleet tonnage. .

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Last week SIW reported that the world shipping fleet (100+ GT) had crossed the 100,000 vessel mark for the first time (see page 14). This week we mark this impressive milestone by taking a look at the world fleet’s progress to six figures, the key statistics as it reached this mark and the components of the fleet’s expansion, before reflecting on the potential nature of the fleet’s future development…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The shipping markets have seen major short-term variation and clear examples of ‘disruption upside’ since the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic. Notably in recent times, container shipping markets have surged (see SIW 1,454), and the gas carrier markets are another sector which saw a markedly positive period. Rates are now falling back, but the spike was notable given the pressures seen earlier in 2020.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

As part of our Green Transition work, this week’s Analysis reviews a rapidly growing market with huge potential: Offshore Renewables. 2020 was a record year for start ups (18 farms, 5.6 GW) and, for the first time, CAPEX committed overtook offshore oil and gas ($51bn vs $41bn). Investments into the “wind” fleet are also gathering pace, with pressures to limit emissions and be “green” across the supply chain.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

With 2020 so far having been clearly dominated by impacts from the Covid-19 pandemic and characterised by major short-term variations in market conditions, in some shipping sectors the second half of the year has so far been shaping up quite differently to the first. The bulkcarrier sector is one illustration of this, with the Capesize market for example having seen different dynamics in recent months.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Against the backdrop of a container shipping sector improving ahead of the expectations of many, this week the 1-year TC rate for an “old Panamax” containership reached a 9-year high of $18,750/day, more than 4 years after the opening of the new, wider Panama Canal locks that some believed would usher in a steady demise for the vessels in this sector.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

30 years is a long time in any sphere, and an even longer time in a fast-paced industry like shipping. The markets of the 1980s seem dim and distant, with a heroic boom and a few crises in between. However, one thing today looks similar: the “classic” orderbook as a percentage of the fleet ratio, a yardstick for assessing future supply growth, is now, at 7.4%, as low as it has been since 1989.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

For many years, SIW has been taking economic statistics and arranging them into a “shipping context”. Prime amongst these has been industrial production (IP) growth, a major element of world economic activity and a key driver of seaborne trade. The Covid-19 crisis illustrates how the statistics can help capture shipping’s underlying “macro” backdrop.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.