Archives for category: Clarksons Research

The LNG sector is currently in a strong growth phase. LNG trade has expanded rapidly over recent years, by an average of 8% p.a. across 2016-18, and a similar rate of growth is expected in 2019-20. As global focus on environmental issues has intensified and efforts are made to increase usage of ‘cleaner’ fuels, there seems to be further significant growth potential for the LNG sector going forwards.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The shipping industry has faced some challenging times since the global financial crisis, including some tough markets and for many a difficult financing environment. However, to keep the wheels of the world economy turning shipping still requires substantial investment, and here we track the total in the post-downturn decade 2009-18 – still a cool one trillion dollars!

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

In recent years, much attention has focussed on the major changes that have been taking place in crude trade patterns, including the recent growth in long-haul trade. However, whilst perhaps less-heralded, seaborne oil products trade has also put in a strong performance, after growth began to accelerate from 2004 onwards. In total, products have accounted for 73% of all seaborne oil trade growth 2004-18.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

There are a range of indicators that can be used to gauge activity in the subsea segment of the offshore industry, including the number of tree awards, the EPC/SURF contractor work backlog and subsea support vessel utilisation trends, for example. Another is the backlog of subsea trees on order at tree fabricators. So where is this indicator now and what might it suggest about the subsea sector generally?

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

This year, the shipping industry is expected to transport 12bn tonnes of cargo. That’s double the volume shipped in 2000 and four times the trade in 1980; the result of economic growth and globalisation. Dry bulk and container trade were at the heart of this in the boom of the 2000s, but both over time and across sectors the seaborne trade growth environment continues to evolve.

 

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

One of the most important building blocks of shipping market economics is the concept of the ‘delivered cost’ of a commodity and freight’s part within it. In general, the freight element of the cost of delivering (i.e. selling from the point of origin and shipping to the buyer) of a commodity is only a limited part of the total delivered cost. This has key implications for shipping market behaviour.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The US has traditionally been one of the most significant importers of energy commodities globally, given its large population’s heavy demand for energy (12.8 MWh/capita in 2016, treble that of China). However, US seaborne energy imports peaked in 2005, and more recently exports have taken off, owing to the shale boom. This led to the US becoming a net seaborne exporter of energy commodities in 2018.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.