Archives for category: Bulkers

Our half year shipping review (see SIW 1,479) profiled “some exceptional individual markets”, and 1H 2021 certainly illustrates how progress in some sectors has been boosted by disruption. Port congestion has hit the headlines and led to notable “disruption upside” for containerships and bulkcarriers in particular. Here we look at some trends indicative of capacity tied up in the various bottlenecks.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

A year ago the Sale and Purchase (S&P) markets were struggling with huge Covid-19 economic uncertainty and the wide ranging logistical challenges of delivering a ship. While difficulties remain (especially around crew transfer), sales volumes have picked up to record levels with over 84m dwt of tonnage bought and sold in the first half and, in some segments, “eye-watering” asset value increases.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

A year on from peak trade disruption, we update our half year report for the shipping industry profiling a strong recovery and some exceptional individual markets. While previous years’ reports have mentioned “must do better” or “extra classes needed”, even the toughest of examiners would congratulate (tankers aside!?) shipping’s economic performance during the many continued challenges of the pandemic.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Extracted from our upcoming Shipping Review & Outlook, this week’s Analysis profiles recovering trade volumes, an encouraging supply side, the increasingly central role of Green Transition and elements of improved sentiment. While uncertainties around the nature of recovery and pressures from the pandemic remain, our projections suggest trade will return to pre-Covid levels in 2021 and reach 12bn tonnes.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Through 2020 our Analysis regularly looked at latest “near-term” shipping demand indicators, first to assess the magnitude of the initial Covid-19 impact and disruption, and then to track improvements in activity and seaborne trade, as volumes recovered in a number of sectors with some of the negative impacts easing back. This week we take a fresh look at the latest readings to check up on recent progress.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

As the shipping industry embarks upon an unprecedented programme of investment and fleet renewal in order to meet emissions targets, we have been profiling progress so far in the uptake of Alternative Fuels, ESTs, “Eco” engines, scrubbers and port facilities (see SIW 1,450, 1,452). This week we drill down on progress in the bulkcarrier sector, a segment accounting for a significant 35% of global fleet tonnage. .

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

After a uniquely challenging year for the shipping industry, our first Analysis of the year reviews some of the dramatic trends from a Covid-19 dominated 2020. Benefiting from elements of “disruption upside”, our cross-segment ClarkSea Index actually ended the year down only 2% y-o-y, experiencing its second highest year since 2010 (after 2019) despite global seaborne trade falling 3.8% to 11.5bn tonnes.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

30 years is a long time in any sphere, and an even longer time in a fast-paced industry like shipping. The markets of the 1980s seem dim and distant, with a heroic boom and a few crises in between. However, one thing today looks similar: the “classic” orderbook as a percentage of the fleet ratio, a yardstick for assessing future supply growth, is now, at 7.4%, as low as it has been since 1989.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

While indicators suggest that the impact of Covid-19 on global seaborne trade may have eased a little in recent months (see SIW 1,433), this year overall has undoubtedly been a very difficult period for seaborne demand. However, whilst imports into many regions have decreased significantly, demand in China, shipping’s largest market, has remained robust, with imports recently reaching record highs.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Covid-19 has led to a major “shock” to the shipping markets, and tracking the impacts has brought a range of metrics, including new “near-term” data, into close focus (see our Shipping Market Impact Tracker on SIN). One statistic, however, which has not received quite so much attention this year has been average vessel speed, but with half of the year completed it’s a good time for an update.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.