Archives for category: Bulkers

Covid-19 has led to a major “shock” to seaborne activity, and we are tracking a range of metrics (see Shipping Intelligence Network) that show the immediate demand side impact in varying ways. However, inevitably some focus has also turned to the shape of the potential future recovery – there are clearly many scenarios, and a growing debate, so a framework for further analysis is a useful step.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

That recent times have been a good demonstration of shipping market volatility comes as no surprise. There have been more than enough major events to drive significant fluctuations in our ClarkSea Index, and the statistics make this clear. Developments in the tanker sector have recently dominated the index trend in terms of volatility, but that doesn’t mean that every sector has followed quite the same storyline… 

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The ‘shock’ to the world economy from the Covid-19 pandemic is exerting clear pressure on seaborne trade. Significant uncertainty remains over the outlook, but current projections suggest the sharpest fall in global seaborne trade for over 35 years in 2020. However, impacts vary across the shipping sectors, with some commodities appearing more heavily exposed to disruption than others.

For the full version of this article, please go to
Shipping Intelligence Network

 

Covid-19 has highlighted how aggregate port call data, whilst sometimes imperfect, can be useful. Regular analysis of daily port calls trends in key countries (see our ‘Port Call Activity Tracker’ in the Covid-19 Reports section on Shipping Intelligence Network) is helping us track the impact of the pandemic, and a broader look at port call data also provides context for understanding the disruption to global shipping.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

A shrinking global orderbook has been one of the more persistent features of the post-financial crisis years, with the volume of tonnage on order now down to c.30% of peak levels. However, a substantial volume of newbuild investment has still taken place over the period as a whole, and a greater focus on specific vessel types has left the current orderbook looking very different to a decade earlier.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

Even for an industry used to disruption, shipping has been struggling with the scale and dynamic nature of the Covid-19 outbreak. Starting in its largest market (China: 22% of seaborne imports), the initial shipping impact was felt quickly and severely. And while there are signs that the Chinese impact may be starting to stabilise (see graph), the focus has shifted to broader global impacts, and investor sentiment.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

As a whole, the key shipping markets made steps forward in 2019, with our ClarkSea Index on average up by 24% on the previous year. In a number of sectors this came against the backdrop of less than wholly supportive “headline” supply-demand fundamentals. Whilst these remain of primary importance, other notable factors have clearly been having a significant impact on market dynamics…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

As we close in on the end of the decade, this week’s analysis compares data from shipping’s last forty years. It’s certainly been a tough decade, much of it spent dealing with the aftermath of the financial crisis and working through shipping’s surplus capacity. But it’s been far from a “dead decade”: trade growth of 3.7bn tonnes, 1.2bn dwt of deliveries and an improving ClarkSea Index as we close out…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Against a backdrop of this week’s IMO meetings on GHG emissions, tracking the annual CO2 output of the shipping industry is today more important than ever. The world fleet’s ‘footprint’ is estimated at 819 million tonnes of CO2 this year, and IMO targets aim for a 50% reduction by 2050 compared to the 1.0 billion tonnes in 2008 (see SIW 1,391), so putting these figures into some context can be important.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

With IMO 2020, fuel economics and carbon targets firmly at the top of the shipping industry agenda, vessel operating speeds are under increasing scrutiny, with some even proposing speed limits at sea to help reduce fuel consumption and take a step towards future decarbonisation targets. This week’s Analysis looks at the significance of tracking trends in speed over the last decade and going forward.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.