Archives for category: Bulkers

Extracted from our upcoming Shipping Review & Outlook, this week’s Analysis profiles recovering trade volumes, an encouraging supply side, the increasingly central role of Green Transition and elements of improved sentiment. While uncertainties around the nature of recovery and pressures from the pandemic remain, our projections suggest trade will return to pre-Covid levels in 2021 and reach 12bn tonnes.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Through 2020 our Analysis regularly looked at latest “near-term” shipping demand indicators, first to assess the magnitude of the initial Covid-19 impact and disruption, and then to track improvements in activity and seaborne trade, as volumes recovered in a number of sectors with some of the negative impacts easing back. This week we take a fresh look at the latest readings to check up on recent progress.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

As the shipping industry embarks upon an unprecedented programme of investment and fleet renewal in order to meet emissions targets, we have been profiling progress so far in the uptake of Alternative Fuels, ESTs, “Eco” engines, scrubbers and port facilities (see SIW 1,450, 1,452). This week we drill down on progress in the bulkcarrier sector, a segment accounting for a significant 35% of global fleet tonnage. .

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

After a uniquely challenging year for the shipping industry, our first Analysis of the year reviews some of the dramatic trends from a Covid-19 dominated 2020. Benefiting from elements of “disruption upside”, our cross-segment ClarkSea Index actually ended the year down only 2% y-o-y, experiencing its second highest year since 2010 (after 2019) despite global seaborne trade falling 3.8% to 11.5bn tonnes.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

30 years is a long time in any sphere, and an even longer time in a fast-paced industry like shipping. The markets of the 1980s seem dim and distant, with a heroic boom and a few crises in between. However, one thing today looks similar: the “classic” orderbook as a percentage of the fleet ratio, a yardstick for assessing future supply growth, is now, at 7.4%, as low as it has been since 1989.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

While indicators suggest that the impact of Covid-19 on global seaborne trade may have eased a little in recent months (see SIW 1,433), this year overall has undoubtedly been a very difficult period for seaborne demand. However, whilst imports into many regions have decreased significantly, demand in China, shipping’s largest market, has remained robust, with imports recently reaching record highs.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Covid-19 has led to a major “shock” to the shipping markets, and tracking the impacts has brought a range of metrics, including new “near-term” data, into close focus (see our Shipping Market Impact Tracker on SIN). One statistic, however, which has not received quite so much attention this year has been average vessel speed, but with half of the year completed it’s a good time for an update.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Covid-19 has led to a major “shock” to seaborne activity, and we are tracking a range of metrics (see Shipping Intelligence Network) that show the immediate demand side impact in varying ways. However, inevitably some focus has also turned to the shape of the potential future recovery – there are clearly many scenarios, and a growing debate, so a framework for further analysis is a useful step.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

That recent times have been a good demonstration of shipping market volatility comes as no surprise. There have been more than enough major events to drive significant fluctuations in our ClarkSea Index, and the statistics make this clear. Developments in the tanker sector have recently dominated the index trend in terms of volatility, but that doesn’t mean that every sector has followed quite the same storyline… 

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The ‘shock’ to the world economy from the Covid-19 pandemic is exerting clear pressure on seaborne trade. Significant uncertainty remains over the outlook, but current projections suggest the sharpest fall in global seaborne trade for over 35 years in 2020. However, impacts vary across the shipping sectors, with some commodities appearing more heavily exposed to disruption than others.

For the full version of this article, please go to
Shipping Intelligence Network