Archives for category: bulk

One of the notable features of the shipping markets in 2017 was the record level of S&P activity, with reported sales volumes topping 90m dwt in capacity and more than 1,600 units. After a slow start in early 2018, this year’s activity levels subsequently picked up, but indications suggest a slower Q3 than one year previously. Where does this leave 2018 S&P volumes against last year’s record?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

This week, the US announced that further tariffs on a wide range of imports from China will come into force from Monday, with China confirming retaliatory measures. These developments represent an escalation in the dispute over trade between the two countries, and against this backdrop, it is worth taking another look (see SIW 1327) at the potential impact of tariffs announced this year in a shipping context.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Economists use a range of tools to demonstrate the degree of fragmentation, consolidation, or in economic terms, ‘concentration’ across a range of industrial activity. Shipping is often thought of as a fairly fragmented industry, and the shipbuilding industry is today undergoing a period of significant consolidation. How might an economics approach illustrate the prevailing degree of concentration in each case?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The economist John Maynard Keynes famously commented that “In the long run we are all dead”, and for shipping market players waiting for cyclical markets to improve it might sometimes feel like that. But with two of the previously long-suffering sectors enjoying better times recently, how do the improved market conditions impact on a long-term view of performance?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

The shipping industry is essential to the smooth functioning of the world economy, transporting around 85% of the world’s international trade in tonnage terms. So it comes as no surprise that ships are all over the world at any given time. However, the ability to identify ships’ positions by vessel tracking systems today means that one can be more precise than ever in breaking this down a little further…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

January 26th is Australia Day, a chance to celebrate all things Australian: vegemite, sporting prowess, BBQs, surfing, unusual (and frequently lethal) wildlife, digeridoos, Uluru, Kylie, Mad Max and so on. But from a shipping and seaborne trade perspective, perhaps the most relevant features of Australia are literally from the land ‘down under’, namely iron ore, coal and natural gas.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

A key driver of seaborne trade growth over the last two decades has been the spectacular economic rise of China. With the Chinese economy likely to gradually mature, the idea of the “next China” for shipping has been often discussed, and India has often been put forward in this context. There are many factors to consider, but in any evaluation of this possibility, trends in India’s energy sector are highly significant.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.