It is often noted that the shipping market’s component parts make it ‘multi-cyclical’, helpful in an industry where the number of variables is large and volatility prevalent. It seems like this view is a reasonable assumption: at any given time one or more markets may be under pressure but equally circumstances are likely to be favouring other markets at the same time. But how to test it?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Sale and purchase has long been a central part of the shipping markets, and with 13,800 units reported sold secondhand across the shipping and offshore sectors over the last decade, this clearly remains the case. In fact, 2017 was a record year for S&P volumes with 2018 not too far behind. A range of factors influence secondhand transaction volumes; comparing ‘liquidity’ across sectors highlights some of these.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

“Going the extra mile” has become a classic part of “business-speak”, but in the shipping business it can have a more literal meaning. Distance plays a huge role in determining the impact of trade flows on vessel demand, and is therefore a key variable in the shipping market equation. Tracking the changes in the distances covered by seaborne trade is an important element of the demand-side framework.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The first quarter of the year is often a seasonally weak period for the shipping markets, and 2019 so far has proved no exception. Although the ClarkSea Index has risen by 13% y-o-y so far this year, it still fell by over 30% from multi-year highs in late 2018 to below $10,000/day by mid-February. Against a backdrop of building demand risks, how severe has this year’s seasonal slide been in a historical context?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The offshore sector has seen some impressive gas projects over the last decade, from the development of the vast South Pars/North Field to the start-up of pioneering mega-projects off Australia and the introduction of FLNGs. Accounting for 32% of total gas output, offshore gas is now a key part of the global energy mix. But similar could be said of US shale gas. So how do shale and offshore gas measure up?

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

There are a number of key differences between the ‘liner’ shipping business (largely served by containerships) and the world of ‘tramp’ shipping (much of tanker and bulker activity, for example). One of the most obvious is the ‘dual’ nature of the container shipping markets, with separate ‘freight’ and ‘charter’ markets connecting to keep the liner network going. But do they always move in harmony?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Powered by ongoing innovation, drilling activity and infrastructure projects, the US energy revolution seems to be continuing apace, with the country likely to become a consistent net crude oil exporter within a few years. But as the recent FID at the 15.6 mtpa Golden Pass LNG plant in Texas suggests, seaborne LNG trade is being significantly affected by the shale boom in the US’s vast interior too…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.