Global seaborne trade has nearly doubled since the turn of the century and in the consensus view, looks likely to continue on an upwards path in the long term. One important element of this trend is rising per capita trade as the world becomes wealthier. But where, exactly, might further per capita seaborne trade growth come from? The concept of an economic ‘tipping point’ and a few examples can be helpful here.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

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2018 looks set to be a good year for ABBA fans, after the Swedish pop group announced plans to release their first new songs since the 1980s. With the band’s greatest hits album back in the charts again, it’s clear there’s still appetite for recycling old classics. In shipping’s recycling market, meanwhile, 2018 has seen volumes remain elevated, but with different ship types having stepped into the spotlight.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

In the old song “It’s a long way to Tipperary”, the Irish county in question is “a long way back home”. For shipping it must feel a little like that too. Despite more positive sentiment, a supportive world economy, robust trade growth and slowing capacity expansion in many sectors, truly strong markets might still seem in many cases some distance away. But how far along the way are the shipping markets really?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Shipping markets are by their nature cyclical, but anticipating the timing of market cycles is rarely easy in practice, not least because shipping’s cycles are so enmeshed with other economic cycles, notably in underlying commodity markets. For example, while some of the key shipping sectors appear to be moving into the next phase of the cycle, current oil market uncertainties are complicating matters elsewhere.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Shallow water field developments can often be overshadowed by complex deepwater projects involving MOPUs and subsea trees. Yet shallow water, fixed platform developments remain a key part of the offshore sector and a significant source of vessel demand in many areas. And with some notable fixed platform project FIDs coming up, a review of this sometimes neglected segment seems timely.

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

The shipping markets are renowned for their volatility but today there is one aspect of the industry where the last cycle has taken 20 years. The orderbook expressed as a percentage of the existing fleet, a widely used statistic, is basically back where it was twenty years ago, following a very long cycle indeed, and the trajectory in the meantime is well worth a closer examination.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

At the start of April, the commencement of joint operations between the major Japanese liner companies in the form of ‘ONE’ ushered in the latest step along the road in the consolidation of the container shipping sector. In February 2017 we took a look at how the concentration in the sector was evolving, and now seems like a good time to review how the profile looks today.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.