The last few months have seen increasing friction surrounding trade globally, with the US and China in particular making headlines for announcing proposals to introduce new import tariffs. These developments have raised concerns over a potential negative impact on seaborne trade volumes, but how much trade could actually be affected? The devil is in the detail, so this week’s Analysis takes a closer look…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

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West Africa, which accounts for 16% of global offshore oil production, has been perhaps the most challenged region in the offshore downturn. Rig utilisation, for example, fell to a lower level (48%) than in any other region. But with oil prices currently back in the $70-$80/bbl range, there are some signs that things could be picking up, not least Total’s recent FID at the $1.2bn Zinia Ph.2 deepwater project off Angola.

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

 

From one viewpoint, given the huge range of companies involved, the ownership of the world fleet can look quite fragmented. But from another, the prominence of larger owners who account for the majority of tonnage is quite clear too. Upon closer inspection however, some sectors appear proportionally more likely to be home to the bigger, more diversified players than others.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

2018 so far has been a year of firming oil prices. Despite continued strong output growth from US shale, the crude price has risen, with Brent even topping $80/bbl, fuelled by political risk: Venezuelan instability, North Korea and sanctions on Iran. Supply outages, plus higher prices muting demand, have hit the tanker market. However, the flip side has been more positive indications (at last) in the offshore sector.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

 

Brazil’s offshore sector has faced various challenges in recent years but nevertheless still accounts for 11% of all offshore oil production, 20% of all ultra-deepwater fields and 23% of FPSO deployments globally. It also still has significant untapped potential, or at least so many international oil companies seem to think, if the results of the country’s most recent offshore block licensing rounds are any guide.

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

In June 2016, the ‘Neo-Panamax’ locks at the Panama Canal opened to commercial traffic, enabling a much larger proportion of the world’s fleet to transit the canal. Nearly two years on, official dimension restrictions at the Neo-Panamax locks are being amended, with an even greater share of the fleet theoretically capable of passing through the canal from 1st June onwards.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

As the shipping community begins to gather for Posidonia, this week’s analysis reviews the market leading position of Greek owners. Ten years on from the financial crisis, Greek owners have expanded their control of the world fleet from a 13% to 17% share, today operating some 218m GT (370m dwt) valued at USD 105 billion. Certainly worth raising a glass (or two) while enjoying the parties and cocktails!

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.