The US has traditionally been one of the most significant importers of energy commodities globally, given its large population’s heavy demand for energy (12.8 MWh/capita in 2016, treble that of China). However, US seaborne energy imports peaked in 2005, and more recently exports have taken off, owing to the shale boom. This led to the US becoming a net seaborne exporter of energy commodities in 2018.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Once in a while, one of the many statistics regularly updated in Shipping Intelligence Weekly reaches a major milestone, and this month we have a significant one to reflect upon. As of May 2019, for the very first time we have been able to report on a global shipping fleet comprising over 2 billion deadweight tonnes in capacity. This week’s Analysis reviews the progress from the first billion dwt to the second…

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

It is well known that China ‘turbo-charged’ seaborne trade growth from the early 2000s onwards, as the country’s imports of raw materials such as iron ore, coal and crude oil grew at breakneck speed. Following a 2018 in which Chinese LNG imports represented 60% (15 million tonnes) of net global growth in seaborne LNG trade, it seems only natural to ask, could recent history repeat itself with LNG?

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

The S&P markets have been highly active in recent years, with over 7,000 vessels sold since the start of 2014, and 2017 marking a record year in tonnage and value terms. The Analysis in SIW 1364 examined which sectors have seen large volumes, but looking at the flow of ships between owner nationalities is also illuminating, with most of the liquidity in the market linked to owners in a small number of countries.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Offshore exploration has been challenged since the onset of the downturn. There have been some major discoveries in countries such as Guyana and Mauritania, but oil company exploration spending remains significantly lower than pre-downturn outlay, and in 2018 offshore discoveries fell to the lowest level in around 50 years. That being said, might there now be signs of some improvement to come?

For the full version of this article, please go to Offshore Intelligence Network.

Heavyweights in the political arena are commonly referred to as the “Big Beasts”, but the world shipping fleet has plenty of massive animals of its own. Prominent amongst these are the very large containerships including today’s ‘mega-ships’ of over 20,000 TEU, and together the ships of over 8,000 TEU in size (the ‘big beast’ benchmark back in 2000) now account for the majority of boxship fleet capacity.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.

Providing newbuilding market data has always been a strong focus for Clarksons Research but in recent years there has been a growing need to better understand activity in the ship repair and refurbishment sector. In this week’s Analysis we discuss the reasons behind this interest and present some highlights from a new intelligence flow of ship repair activity now available on our World Fleet Register.

For the full version of this article, please go to Shipping Intelligence Network.